CGP Community Stories

Dorothy Bolton, November 14, 2012

Title

Dorothy Bolton, November 14, 2012

Subject

Burlington Flats
Maple sugar
Maple syrup
Edmeston School
rural healthcare
rural entertainment

Description

Dorothy Bolton is a lifetime resident of Burlington Flats, New York. She grew up as the daughter of a maple syrup producer and continued her agrarian lifestyle when she married a dairy farmer. Though farming remained a major aspect of Mrs. Bolton's life, she held a career within the Edmeston school system for 32 years. She held various positions within the school from cafeteria worker to classroom aid to her final position as secretary to the guidance office.

Mrs. Bolton has witnessed profound changes in her community. She remembers living without the conveniences of electricity and running water, the centralization of rural schools, gas rationing during World War II, and the introduction of "hard" roads. As the daughter of Murray Benjamin, Mrs. Bolton recounts her childhood on her father's sugar farm and memories of rural healthcare and recreation. She provides a unique perspective that supplements her parents' 1970 shotgun interview (housed in the NYSHA library, 70-0069). The memories of her adult life highlight the ways farming families worked to make ends meet and drastic changes in both farming and the Burlington area since the 1930s.

This interview provides snippets of everyday life in Burlington over the past seventy years as well as contemporary reflections on the past and how it differs from today. Mrs. Bolton paints a vivid picture of her childhood by showing what Burlington and the surrounding area once looked like. It highlights the past struggles of small farmers in comparison to farming practices today. The observations on rural healthcare and how farming families provided medical care to their children are particularly interesting in light of the Bassett Healthcare Network's presence in Cooperstown, NY and the surrounding area.

Creator

Emily Hopkins

Publisher

Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University of New York -College at Oneonta

Date

2012-11-14

Rights

New York State Historical Association Library, Cooperstown, NY

Format

audio/mpeg
27.5 mB
image/jpeg

Language

en-US

Type

Sound
Image

Identifier

12-009

Coverage

Upstate New York
1927-2012
Burlington Flats, NY

Online Submission

No

Interviewer

Emily Hopkins

Interviewee

Dorothy Bolton

Location

1909 County Highway 16
Burlington Flats, NY 13315

Transcription

DB: Dorothy Bolton
EH: Emily J. Hopkins

[START OF TRACK 1, 0:00]

EH:
This is November 14th, 2012 interview of Mrs. Dorothy Bolton by Emily Hopkins for the Cooperstown Graduate Program Community Stories Project, recorded at 1909 County Highway 16 in Burlington Flats, New York. So Mrs. Bolton, can you please tell me where you grew up or about the area?

DB:
Yeah, I grew up just two miles up the road in the village of Burlington. I lived next to the store and there was a cemetery and an old church across the way and another church just on the corner. When I got married moved down the road about two miles.

EH:
Great. So did you grow up on a farm in Burlington?

DB:
Yes, the house was right in the middle of the village, the barn was up the road a little bit and Dad had a lot of property way up the road too, because he not only had cattle he had a big maple syrup business.

EH:
And so the cattle was raised for beef?

DB:
What did you say?

EH:
The cattle was raised for beef?

DB:
No milk cows.

EH:
Milk cows?

DB:
They shipped milk. So they were pretty busy.

EH:
Could you tell me a little bit about your dad's sugaring business or syrup business?

DB:
Oh my goodness. Yes, he was one of the largest maple syrup producers in the eastern United States and he started out with horses drawing the sap up to the sugar house and ended using trucks and getting sap tapping trees along the road as far up as West Winfield. Plus, he had big maple sugar bushes, lots of trees right on his own property. The most he ever made was 5,000 gallons one year. But that doesn't all go into cans. It was also shipped in drums up to Vermont. Dad always used to say they used it just for syrup. They didn't put it in tobacco like they say they buy it for. But he was very proud of his maple syrup business and my mom worked just as hard as my dad because she made maple sugar cakes and maple cream. They were very, very hard workers. They even took their products to state fair along with the booth, they had a big booth from maple syrup producers, selling products at the fair. And so they would go up and stay in it. They weren't very young [in their 60's and 70's] when they did this. They were workers.

EH:
Could you tell me a little bit more about the syrup in the tobacco?

DB:
Well they use a lot of syrup to sweeten tobacco. So even though they said they bought it for tobacco products, Dad would say it's such good syrup they probably re-canned it and sold it but I don't know.

EH:
What do you mean by [being proud of his maple syrup?]

DB:
Well he was very careful in how he always was sure the syrup was to the right degree for canning. He just was so proud; he wanted everything perfect. He was really proud of his syrup business. Anybody that came, he would stop whatever he was doing and explain everything and different of classes of school went up there on a school visit. They always gave everybody free maple candy. The candies were in shapes of maple leaves. They made them in molds. Mom made all of the sugar, she made all the sugar and all the cream. Dad did [it] all down at the sugar house. He didn't do it all himself. He had lots of help. All of my family, my husband used to go and boil nights for them when they had so much syrup. My kids worked up there. I canned syrup up there. So it was truly a family affair because there's lots of us in the family. Everybody that lived nearby always helped out.

EH:
Could you tell me more some of the specific tasks that you had with the syrup business?

DB:
When I was little?

EH:
Yeah.

DB:
Yeah, when I was little we had to go to school, of course, and sometimes we stayed with my, we called her Auntie, that lived across the road from where our big house was. We stayed there and went to school but after school we'd usually walk up to the sugar bush which was probably a mile or two up in the woods. They had a camp up there that they moved to. When I was real little I'm sure I was just a pain in the neck. Didn't want to be there, wanted to be doing something else. As I got older I canned an awful lot of syrup. They would bring it up to the house and I would sit on a block of wood that fit just right. I would can syrup and the kids would help carry it to where they had to store it. I would help Mom on the weekends. I went up even though I worked at Edmeston School. In the afternoons, when I got out of work, I would go up and help and then on weekends I'd go up because they fed everybody that worked up there. They made a big dinner. They would have pies, roast beef, spaghetti, and lots of times there were 20 or 22 people at that table. Taking turns, of course. During that season they worked really hard and when they weren't doing sugaring, Dad, because he was so proud of his maple syrup business, would go up and trim the brush out of his sugar bush. Trim the trees, the brush out so it all looked so nice. Dad had a big garden. We raised all of our own vegetables and Mom canned all the vegetables. I can remember even going and picking wild strawberries. And if you were tired of picking wild strawberries you sat down and you hulled them until we were ready to go from the field. I don't think Mom ever had any spare time. They didn't know any different, they just loved the work. There was no TV back then, they had radios, but no TV, no electricity way back. I don't think they got electricity until the early 1940s. I don't know, it was a hard life but one they were very, very proud of.

EH:
What do you mean by it's a hard life?

DB:
Working. It took a lot of work. And during the winter, before the season started, Dad would be soddering the buckets because at that time you had buckets that hung on all the trees. You didn't have pipeline, you had buckets, and naturally some of them would get leaks. So he would go up to the sugar bush and [go through] all the buckets, test them, sodder the buckets so they wouldn't lose any sap when he started sugaring. We used horses to begin with and then tractors, which made it much easier.

EH:
You talked about how he would cut the brush and things to make the property look nice. Was there any practical function to that?

DB:
No, it's just you could get through the woods easier to gather sap without brush on the ground. Anytime you have a woods, if there's winds or anything, the dead branches fall down. He would go up and cut them up and clean it up so that when you looked up you just saw trees. You didn't see any garbage. There was no function to it except to make it look better and easier to get through to gather sap.

EH:
In what ways was [your dad fair]?

DB:
In paying people to work. They fed them all and he would make jack wax. Usually once during the season, everybody would come in and have jack wax. I don't know if you know what jack wax is?

EH:
No ma'am.

DB:
It would be you would boil syrup down a lot farther and you'd have buckets of clean snow and you'd drop the syrup on snow and it would sort of like gum up and you could pick it up with a fork and put it in your mouth, resembled a caramel, but just a piece of syrup. And then anybody that wanted to could have stir syrup and make it into sugar. They would pour it on wax paper and then take it with them. He did that at least once a year for all the employees.

EH:
So that would be in the winter then?

DB:
No, during the season. Right? With the fresh new syrup. There would still be snow, a lot of times during the whole sugar season. They'd be stomping through snow to gather the sap.

EH:
And can you clarify when the sugaring season is?

DB:
It could start as early as the end of January but usually we figured we'd be up to the sugar house to stay by the middle of March. It would go March through April. But the seasons have changed so now, mercy me, you couldn't depend on them at all now. The weather has just changed so much, you used to be able to pretty much depend on it. If you tapped trees in January then they would be more snow and cold so they wouldn't do anything for a while usually. They would always move, because they moved right up to the sugar camp during the season, sugar season. And that would probably be the middle of March on average.

EH:
And the sugar camp was actually a separate property with a house?

DB:
Yeah, there was a house. On the first floor, just all sort of open except one little closed in area where Mom and Dad slept but otherwise it was eating, making syrup and sugar, and working.

EH:
Do you remember going up there and staying with them?

DB:
[After I married] I never stayed nights because I had a family and I also worked at school so I'd go up usually when I got out of work in the afternoon. At that time I worked in the cafeteria but then I moved on to other positions. But I would go up. The kids when they got out would have to go up with me. And they would play or be down at the sugar bush. That was a big part of our life that. But it didn't last long. The rest of the time we lived back in our big house.

EH:
What do you mean it didn't last long?

DB:
The season. You weren't up there, not usually over six weeks. If you went up the middle of March you'd be back by the end of April. It's all dependent on the weather. When you moved and when you came back. I know that everybody was awfully glad when the end of the season came and we could come back home even though we didn't have electricity back home either. It was a good life.

EH:
As far as your parents selling the syrup and things like that, was there a store at their sugar camp or did they just come?

DB:
[They came up to the sugar camp mostly] on Saturday and Sunday. Sometimes we would be so busy that there would be people waiting to come in the house to buy the sugar cakes and syrup. But we also sold it in a store up in Ilion, I believe, sold a lot of the syrup. They came to the house and they came to the house all during the year [even] when they moved back to the house people would come there. Mom tried to have sugar and cream most of the year.

EH:
Do you remember selling it yourself? Was that one of your tasks?

DB:
No, well yeah. Yes, we'd help because there'd be a lot of people at the same time. If they came in for a bag of sugar, which was a pound, and twenty pieces of maple leaves and dad always put it in at least two extra, he never weighed them. He said 20 makes a pound usually. But always he threw in a couple extra. It was a dollar a bag at that time. And syrup at that time, way, way back, when I was in high school, was 5 dollars a gallon. And now I think it runs 40, 50 dollars a gallon.

EH:
That's a big difference.

DB:
Yes. I had brothers that did syruping and now my brothers are gone. Their sons still do some sugaring. Make syrup. They don't make much sugar anymore but they do make the syrup and sell that.

EH:
Do they have your dad's property where they still do syrup?

DB:
Yes, Dad divided up his property and tried to do it evenly. So they were able to continue.

EH:
Could you tell me about the differences between the chores that you did and your sisters did versus your siblings?

DB:
No, I was the youngest girl. I had five brothers younger than I and they didn't ever work in the house and do anything, make pies or make spaghetti or like that. Whereas I'd do whatever Mom wanted me to, usually helped cook the meals and help serve the guys when they came in, do dishes and dishes and dishes, and make cookies and all of that regular work, plus canning syrup. I never used the machines. They had two different machines that they used to make the maple sugar leaves and the maple cream. I never tried to do that, I probably figured I wouldn't do it as good as Mom so she always made the sugar we used and the cream. No, I just did whatever they wanted me to do.

EH:
So your brothers, they were mostly working outside...

DB:
Yeah, they gathered sap. The older ones, my older brothers, would boil down in the sugar house. The younger ones couldn't, they didn't know a lot [about] boiling the sap. The older boys [helped] boil sap. My husband would go back and boil quite often at night. He was farming so he couldn't get away in the day much. They had a lot of help. That was their life. And they shipped milk also. They had a big garden. They raised most of their own vegetables and their meat. We had our own beef, we always raised pigs, we always had chickens. So we had our own eggs and they killed the animals and processed the meat themselves. Now if you process the meat the way they used to it'd be spoiled completely. It always kept then.

EH:
Why is that?

DB:
I have no idea, but I remember we would make sausage and put the sausage in containers, and then you'd heat the lard, cover it with lard and it would keep. You might put it down in the cellar where it was cold. You didn't worry about dying the next day from food poisoning from the meat. They put meat down in brine, the hams and the bacon. Brine, I don't know if it was vinegar, I don't know what the brine was. And then hang it up to dry and then just cut it off, get it out of the cellar and cut off the hams when you wanted it. And now they'd come in and tell you couldn't do that, I'm sure.

EH:
Can you tell me more about your siblings and how many you had?

DB:
I had five brothers younger than I. Well I'll tell you there were 13 of us all together. Eight boys and five girls. There's only four of us left. I have one sister and two brothers left out of thirteen.

EH:
Do y'all still get together?

DB:
We have a reunion; we have it here. We've had it now for, I don't know how many years, four or five years. And quite a lot come. Doesn't matter what date you pick, it's people that have all their own [things]. And we'll continue to have it. We're going to have it again this year. And everybody enjoys coming. They bring a dish to pass and go down across the road to Tom's swimming pool, the kids and everyone. It's a good time.

EH:
And who's Tom?

DB:
My son. He lives right across the road. We gave them all property to build on. And I have two other sons, Jack and Jim, and they have property right next door more or less. We gave them the land to build on. My daughter worked around here for awhile and then she went to Massachusetts and worked. She was going to transfer to either California or Texas, she decided to come back home. She bought a house and I moved in with her. It's nice that family is still all here.

EH:
It sounds like most of your family did stay in Burlington.

DB:
Yes, yes they did. But right now, of my family, the farthest one away is my granddaughter who lives down in Annandale, Virginia and works at the Education Department in D.C. Otherwise, my grandchildren all live close by.

EH:
As far as like your siblings, did they feel the need to stay in Burlington or did they move away?

DB:
No, I think their jobs are here and they got married.

EH:
You mentioned about how you had to come when you were working your other job, to help with sugaring and things like that because your sisters weren't around...

DB:
Nope. Neither sister was. Carrie was the oldest one in the family and she lived in Oneonta and Mildred lived in Gilbertsville. So I was the only girl. Actually I just felt I needed to help Mom. But Mom and Dad were very fair, they insisted on paying the boys to help. But he depended on them a little and expected them to come when they needed them. Whereas the other people and the help they came just when they could.

EH:
And what kind of jobs did your sisters have?

DB:
I don't think my sister in Oneonta ever had a job. She worked up in the extension service for awhile but I think most of the things she did were volunteer. Her husband was a farmer; they had a big farm. Then she had three children, two boys and a girl. Mildred worked out, she worked at [Norwich] Furniture Factory, I believe. But she had six children.

EH:
Could you tell me a little bit about the jobs you had once you got married?

DB:
Yes, I worked at Bassett Hospital for almost a year. But because I really needed to be home during the summertime because I had four children and to take care, and with my husband trying to do farming and everything, sort of hard to watch four kids. I got a job at school where I got a job, in the cafeteria. I worked there a good many years. Then I moved up to an aid and then moved up to the library. Then I moved up to guidance office secretary. And then I ended up being secretary to the guidance director and special-ed person. At that time I had to work summers too, but the kids were way up out of school out by then. I worked at the school for 32 years.

EH:
And who took care of your kids when you were working at Bassett?

DB:
They were in school all but one. So either my husband if he could or my mother who lived right up town, watched them.

EH:
You mentioned that you moved up in the school system. What kind of education did you have?

DB:
We went to a little one-room school house down here. We'd walk, or once in a great while, Mr. Bull who had this store on the corner would take his kids and take us down to school. But otherwise, we walked to school. They had grades one through eight and there was one teacher. Then when I was in fifth grade they centralized over at the Edmeston School and they had a bus and went to Edmeston. I graduated from Edmeston and got married shortly after and I did not go on to college or anything. I just helped on the farm. And then it seemed like the farm couldn't meet the expenses so I decided I guess I'd better go to work. I started in 1958 working at Edmeston School. I worked there until 1990, I retired in 1990. So I worked 32 years.

EH:
Wow.

DB:
I had my summers off until I got to be secretary over there and then I had to work in the summer. By that time the kids were old enough to not have to worry about.

EH:
So it was kind of difficult to make ends meet on the farm?

DB:
Yes, and it's still difficult to make ends meet on the farm. Things aren't good for farmers. It's an awful lot of hard work. Can't go to your kids' games after school because you have to be there to milk the cows. It's a hard life, farming, an awful hard life. You work mighty hard and you miss an awful lot that you can't go to, the kids' things in school, sports and they were all involved in sports. But you make it.

EH:
So, did you ever feel like your kids felt disappointed that maybe your husband couldn't make it to...?

DB:
Oh, I think definitely. Sometimes he'd go to the baseball games and get home at 7 o'clock and call the cows in and do his chores then. And basketball, he did not care about. They were too darn noisy, he said. Not the players, the spectators. He didn't care for that. But he did enjoy when he could go to baseball games.

EH:
You mentioned that they centralized the schools in this area when you were in school. Can you talk a little bit about that?

DB:
I really don't know much. We went there in the one-room school house and then all of a sudden they said they were centralized and the bus would pick us up and take us over to Edmeston to school. So away we went over there in fifth grade. Of course it was considerably different than this one-room school house where we played tricks on the teacher and different things...

EH:
Like what?

DB:
Like what? Well she always, in the wintertime, she said we could go out to play. She'd ring the bell when we should come. So when you heard the bell come. So one day the bigger boys, in the seventh or eighth grade, said let's go up town, up where we lived, ride down Route 80 because then it was all dirt road. So we went up and rode downhill, so naturally we didn't hear the bell. When we got back, we couldn't go out for recess for several days.

EH:
Oh no.

DB:
But it was fun. There was an outhouse, no bathroom, of course, because no electricity. We had a wood shed for wood because it was a wood stove in the school. We learned a lot. We did just as well as anybody else who was over there, when we centralized. It was a good education for little grades. And then we joined whatever we wanted to once we got over there. I graduated in 1945, a long time ago.

EH:
Was the transition hard from the one school?

DB:
No. I mean a lot of kids in the class. More kids in your class when you moved over there than there was in the whole little school. There might have been, I don't know, maybe 15, 18 kids, because there were only a couple, three kids in each grade [in the one-room school house.]

EH:
What were some of the classes that were different than what you would have had in the one room school house?

DB:
You had gym, P.E., and you had music class, which you didn't have any of those. I imagine we had art class once we moved over there. All those extra special things that down here you got what they used to say the three R's: reading, writing, and arithmetic.

[START OF TRACK 2, 0:03]

EH:
And were you active in extra-curriculars?

DB:
Yeah, I played basketball. But I was in high school in '41 through '45. There was gas rationing, so we had intramurals but we very seldom traveled a lot for sports. My kids had football and all of that, but myself, I only remember playing basketball and [the] rules were completely different then than they are now. But I was a cheerleader. That's about it I guess.

EH:
How did World War II affect your high school experience? Or your experience in general?

DB:
Nothing, except you just didn't go on class trips and it's completely different nowadays than it was then. They do so many extra things, go to the zoo and so many things. You couldn't go to things because of gas rationing. Times were I guess a little tough. They were always the same for us on the farm. The war years didn't bother us as far as what we did. We were in a little town and we kept on milking cows and doing the syrup and raising the garden and same old things.

EH:
The war, you didn't really feel like it affected your farm life?

DB:
No, you knew and you were aware of all the people who were being killed in service and you know, people who had to go and like that. It definitely was not a good thing. But, as far as doing anything to our lives it didn't, except like in school you weren't able to travel as much with gas rationing and like that.

EH:
Did you know many people who had to serve in the War?

DB:
[Some.] There was a cousin that was killed. Sherril Hall. But no, there were a few local people killed in the war. So many people being killed nowadays, it's a disgrace, it's horrid. Afghanistan, we have a couple of people the church is sponsoring, one is in the helicopter unit. He's not in a very safe place, two helicopters have been shot down right where he is. I hate the war. My son served in Vietnam and he was there a whole year. I did not like that either. That was a very dangerous place where he was for a year and a half. A year, he was there a year, he was in Germany a year and a half. Thank God he came home safe.

EH:
What do you feel like's the big difference between World War II and some of these more modern wars?

DB:
I really don't know. I just know too many people are being killed. They should bring them all home. I might get in trouble for saying that. It's true, it's horrid.

EH:
Well, we'll switch gears a little bit. If you could tell me a little bit about when you got married.

DB:
I graduated [in June 1945] then three or four more days later I got married.

EH:
Oh wow.

DB:
And I moved from uptown down to a farm, mile and a half, two miles at the most, right down the road. I was very happy. I had a fantastic husband. We had four children, a daughter and three boys.

EH:
Can you tell me a little bit more about your husband and how y'all met?

DB:
He lived up the road, maybe a couple of miles farther up. I think I was a junior in high school when we first started dating. We just dated and dated and dated and got married.

EH:
Did he help with your dad with sugaring or anything like that?

DB:
Oh yes, he helped. I don't know if he ever helped before we got married or not. After we got married he helped what he could. We had the farm. Farming in a way was not as easy because you didn't have balers, you had to put the hay through a hay roller up on a wagon and then it was completely different. Much harder but then you didn't do as much. Nowadays people do their property and do other people's that aren't using their land there, haying too. And, of course, machinery is very expensive. It's just completely different from the way farming was when we first started out and the way farming is now. You know, a piece of machinery's 30, 40 thousand dollars. Back then you used your horses and you had milk in milk cans not in bulk tanks. It was a different life then. Of course electricity, that was the biggest help of all.

EH:
How did electricity impact your farming practices and techniques?

DB:
They had surge milkers and you didn't have to ever milk cows by hand. You milked them with a milking machine. Then they went in to what they call station cans and put it in a cooler and in water to keep it cool until the truck came around. They'd pick up your cans and take them to, I believe there was a creamery right in Edmeston at the time. And then it went after awhile you had a bulk tank. The milk went from the cows right in the bulk tank. You didn't have to carry the milk and dump it. It got much easier but of course it cost a small fortune to do all of that. The bulk tank, I believe we paid in the vicinity of 20 thousand dollars for the bulk tank and pipeline and all of that when we installed it, good many years ago. Now that's I'm sure, a much easier way yet still. Everything gets improved all the time. Farming is one of the hardest jobs in the world. Because you have to always be there, holidays or what. Those cows have to be milked night and morning. And so it's a very, very hard job. A hard position, vocation, or whatever you want to call it.

EH:
And then, the system that you're talking about with the bulk tank, did y'all have to go into debt to buy that?

DB:
Oh yes. Oh yeah, you had always had to borrow money and pay so much a month to the bank. But that's one thing we always did, paid our bills on time. Probably if we had borrowed more money and went bigger, we would have had more money, you would have made more money. We just did not dare borrow more money for fear we would not be able to pay it back. So we were always a little farmer. There were a lot of big farmers around here that did a lot better than we did. We were a little farmer; we made it. Raised our kids and Pat went to college and business school, I should say. The other boys didn't, [Jim] went into the service and Jack went right to work for the county. Tom stayed on the farm, Bruce [ her husband] had to have help on the farm so Tom stayed on the farm. Tom and the grandsons still have the farm.

EH:
Are they still using the equipment that y'all bought back then?

DB:
Well, of course, you have to get something new if something breaks, you have to get it. After awhile that wears out. But no, the machinery's here. They still use the balers and the rakes for the haying. Tractors of course, you always have to have tractors for the haying. Plus, get wood out for the furnaces. They still do use the equipment, yes.

EH:
And then, as far as the farm that you and your husband had, how did he fill the void as far as who was working on it once you had to go work outside the home?

DB:
The kids were all little when I started working. I went to work in 1958 and they were all little. They all helped on the farm with the haying in the summer and like that. And then Tom was the last one, the baby, so when he graduated from school, Bruce could not handle the farm by himself and the other boys all had jobs by that time and it was fine with them if Tom stayed and worked on the farm so Tom worked on the farm because he only needed one. So there were no problems there at all because the oldest one, Jim, worked on the state roads, and Jack worked on the county roads and my daughter had a position up in Massachusetts, worked out there for years.

EH:
So did your husband have to hire any workers?

DB:
No, we never hired anybody on the farm. I used to help throw bales on the elevator. And I helped because when the boys were gone it was just Tom and I. I would help with what I could.

EH:
When you came home from work at school or wherever, would you have to then start working on the farm in the afternoon?

DB:
Usually they were pretty well done by the time I got home. In the summertime, I did not work. When I worked in the cafeteria and as an aid, I had the summer off so then I was here when the kids were little. Of course because I worked at school, they came home when I did. I was always home and able to take care of them. That's why I wanted the job at school simply because I would be home to help with haying in the summer what I could [phone rings]. Excuse me.

EH:
We'll stop it for a second.

[TRACK 3 0:00]

EH:
This is Emily Hopkins interviewing Mrs. Dorothy Bolton. This is the second part of our interview on November 14th, 2012 at 1909 County Highway 16 in Burlington Flats, NY. So, Mrs. Bolton, we were talking a little bit about farming and your farm experience. I was wondering if you could tell me a little bit more about the differences between the smaller farms in this area versus the larger farms.

DB:
Yeah, smaller farms were definitely what we were on. We did not have anything to start with. We had to buy the farm and all the machinery that came with it and then buy the machinery. Farming is a very hard life. Even whether you have more or if you have less. It's still the same amount of work to do. It's a hard life but a good life. I don't think very many of the farmers get divorced around here. I think they work together and so they live more happily than these people that have more. I don't know, but anyway, that's about sum of that.

EH:
When you say you think they're happier, how do you mean?

DB:
They get along. They have to work together. Whereas, I think, I really seriously think there are much fewer divorces. I think families get along better because they work together. They have to work together. The wives help on the farm when they can. I know on the bigger farms, I know some of the women that go out and take down statistics about how much milk this cow was giving or not because they keep records. We never kept records of how much milk each cow gave because we didn't have the money to sell one off and get a new one if they did poorly. We kept the same cows until they didn't give milk anymore and then we sent them to sale. No, I think people get along much better on the farm. I really think they're happier in the end. They work together and kids work when they need to. That's a farmer's life I guess.

EH:
Do you feel like there's a sense of partnership between...

DB:
Definitely. The husband couldn't do it without the wife. And Lord knows, the wife couldn't do the farm without the husband. But sometimes if the wife had to work out to make ends meet, you just had to have more money to make ends meet. I know in our case, the feed bill sort of got ahead of us. We said how are we going to get the feed bill paid, because we weren't paying it all each month. So I went to work and that little bit that I got paid that feed bill and so I just kept working. And I'm mighty glad I did now because of the benefits that I get from working.

EH:
If it hadn't been for that feed bill, do you think you would have gone to work?

DB:
I don't know if I ever would have went to work or not. Because I was happy with not working. But I had a good job, I worked for good people. I liked my job, I always liked my job. The kids that I had, outside playground, they'll come up to me, "Mrs. Bolton, how are you? I remember you way back in school." I was just to a restaurant the other night and a gal came up and she said "Mrs. Bolton, do you remember me?" and I said "Yes I do." I said, "You're a, I can't remember which one, there were quite a few of you." I said, "You're a Carney but I can't remember your first name. I don't know if you're Theresa or Pam." And she said, "Mrs. Bolton, you do remember me!" Well I said, "Almost." It is nice that they still remember me and most of them as being ok, not being an old meany on the playground. I still enjoy parts of when I did work at school because the kids will come up, like I hadn't seen her probably since I left school. Lord knows, I retired in 1990, that was a long time ago. It's a good feeling to have a lot people remember you and come up and say, "Oh, how are you? You haven't changed at all." And they lie a lot too. When I went to vote the other day, there was a gal, just as I was going in, and she came up and gave me a hug. And she said, "Do you remember me?". I said, "Yes" and, of course, I said her maiden name. We had a nice conversation. I was so pleased, she said, "I'm going back to college again." And I said, "For what?". She said, "There's so many troubled people in this world, I want to be a mentor, I want to help drug kids and addicted people. I want to work in the addiction program." And I thought great, you know. And she says, "I remember you so well." And I said, "Thank you, I remember you too." I enjoyed my job. It's harder working when you have a family, oh I know. People nowadays, my grandchildren, they both have to work and they have a little child and it's rough, it's hard. Because you can do so much more with your family if you don't work.

EH:
What were some of the major challenges for you?

DB:
What did you say?

EH:
What were some of the major challenges for you?

DB:
Well, for me, I was very lucky because I was in school so I could take the time, if I wasn't in the middle of feeding kids, to go to a program the kids had at school or not. I was very fortunate because I worked where I did and the hours that I worked gave me time to do things. I was very fortunate.

EH:
Were there parts of your job you didn't enjoy when you were working in the schools?

DB:
Oh yes, sometimes you would get a little annoyed with the teacher. Oh yeah, you did get annoyed with the kids now and then. You'd have to holler a couple or three times to make them mind, especially on the playground. They'd get a little bit rough. No, as a general rule, I liked my job. And I worked 32 years; I worked until I was 62.

EH:
How did people view women who had to go and work outside the home or outside the farm?

DB:
I don't think they thought anything about it. I think even the people who didn't work all the time would sometimes have a part-time job for awhile. I am mighty glad I worked now because of the benefits that you receive after 32 years, a monthly check. That comes in mighty handy along with a Social Security check. My daughter and I, now that she's home and she just retired, we can go to visit relatives that live away and do things we want to do. We get along so well; I'm very happy living here with her.

EH:
I wanted to go back to something you talked about earlier when we were talking about your experience living on a farm and everything. How did y'all go about dividing up supplies and making sure everybody had what they needed, even though y'all had a harder time making ends meet at times?

DB:
You just did. You got what they needed. At school time you went and got it. You saved money and you got it. I think the only time we ever had any problem at all was when the feed bill got ahead of us. Once a bill gets ahead of you, it's hard to get caught up and that's why I went to work. Then when I went to work, even though it was not a huge salary, because I only worked ten months until I got to be a secretary, so that amount of money just helped. We were always able to give presents to the kids. We were doing fine. And if you were able to pay your bills and get presents for your kids for Easter and Christmas and have what you wanted to do, go where you wanted to go, I guess, but we never went anywhere. My husband wasn't much of a traveler; he didn't want to go on an airplane. He didn't want to go on a boat. So the only place we went was with the car. We never went very far at that. But he's not one that wanted to travel. So we were homebodies. He played softball. Those boys that played softball and, even when they were young adults, they had softball leagues. We would take our picnic lunch, our sandwiches and like that for lunch, and watch them play ball and the kids could play around there. That was probably one of the main things that we did was went to softball games. But we'd go to Gilbert Lake in the summer, over there and do things like that. We never traveled far. We didn't need to, there was enough things around here to do. I feel that we were well-to-do. Not well-to-do, well-to-do, but we were fine. I wouldn't have traded my life for anything else.

EH:
You mentioned you always had plenty to do that wasn't necessarily farming. So what were some of the other types of things that y'all did for recreation?

DB:
I don't know if we did much else. We went to softball games while he played softball. We'd go to the beach. We always went to the Morris Fair. We always take the kids to the local Morris Fair. That was always a yearly event that everybody local always went [to]. I don't remember where else much we did go when the kids were little except the beaches around here. You know, the beach, the kids would swim and you'd take a picnic lunch and the fair.

EH:
Was the fair like a really big event that everyone in the county went to?

DB:
Yeah, it was a big event for this area, because it was the only one in the county, it was down in Morris. My kids had raised roosters and chickens and they took them to the fair to be judged and they got ribbons, blue ribbons, for it. They did things like that. I don't think they ever took vegetables, but I know they always took chickens. Rhode Island Red and Plymouth Rocks, I can't even remember the names of the kinds of chickens. They'd take pride in that, raised those and take them down. That was their excuse to have to go down every day to feed the chickens, so they'd get to go down to the fair. I remember that we went to the fair once when I was a young girl. Dad had gotten a bigger car and it had a little seat that tipped out, it was like a foot stool, I remember. I just barely remember. It tipped out from the back seat because there were quite a few of us. We'd go down for the day, we'd take our own lunch, go back to the car at noon for lunch. We'd get so much money to ride on the merry-go-round or Ferris wheel or like that. And then there was something always going on in front of the grandstand. We'd have one day that our parents took us to the fair and that was fun. I did this as a youngster and my kids always also went to the fair and to the beaches. Roller skating. The kids used to go roller skating right over [in] West Burlington and that's no more. There are no more things around here that there used to be. That is one thing that is for the worst. Most places have a lot of things for people to do but around here, there's nothing for young people to do, like my grandchildren that are coming up. There's no roller skating rink close by, we had one in West Burlington and Canadarago Lake, a big one. At that time, when I was dating my husband and afterwards there were big bands that would come. Vaugh Monroe, Count Basie, I can't remember all of them that would come. That's one thing he and I would do, is go to these dances. And we enjoyed that. But they don't have any of those around here anymore. You have to go way to Utica, Syracuse, I don't know where. Roller skating was a big thing. They had movies at one time at Edmeston. The first movie I ever saw was a Shirley Temple movie when I was in probably late grades, seventh or eighth grade maybe. But there's no theater in Edmeston, there's nothing in Edmeston anymore, there's nothing in West Burlington. There's nothing for young people to do unless they go to Oneonta or Utica. Times have changed considerably and not always for the best.

EH:
Why do you think there has been that major change for those kind of things?

DB:
Probably economy, probably they didn't get enough people to make much money as they wanted to make. I really don't know but I figure it has to be that. Of course, you can roller skate in Oneonta, that's the closet place, but that's 30 miles away. But just thinking of the things we used to do compared to now. The bigger isn't always better. I can remember even when Elaine Bull, who lived on the corner next to me, one night she said, "Let's go to roller skate [in West Burlington]." I said, "Well, how are we going to get there?". She said, "Well we can walk, we'll always get a ride back. Somebody will be coming back through." I said, "Well I hope so!" It's after dark then and I didn't like the dark. I remember we got to West Burlington one night, we rented roller skates, I think it was only a buck to rent roller skates. And we did get a ride home. You know, that would be so nice for the kids nowadays if there were things like that to do and there isn't.

EH:
So y'all could just get a ride home when y'all would go places?

DB:
Well, we always hoped we did. We didn't go many times. But I remember the one night we did go and Elaine said , "Come on." I said, "I don't like the dark." I still don't care for the dark. But we had fun. Even though we didn't do much, we had fun. We used to play on the four corners, the roads were dirt roads, Route 80 was a dirt road, County Route 16 was a dirt road so we would play on the four corners in front of the store. Kick the can or tag or hide and seek. When we were probably freshmen, sophomores, played outside, you don't see kids playing outside anymore. They're afraid of what might happen, somebody might kidnap somebody. It's too dangerous to let your kids loose.

EH:
Well, you mentioned that things have kind of changed for the worse, or in some ways they have, what are some others?

DB:
And they have and some things for the better. But people don't dare let their kids even go in the store. They have to keep their eye on them all the time, the little kids, just in case somebody might try to grab them. Well, that was never heard of back in the days. Nobody would kidnap anybody and now some people are so sick, I guess, is the word. I know I wouldn't, in this day and age, take one of my grandchildren, I'd have my hand on them all the time in the store, in a big store. Even if they went to the beach I'd have to have my eye on them all the time. And you never had to worry about things like that happening way back. So that's not for the good. Too many sick people now. And I think that's due to drugs, drugs mostly.

EH:
I wanted to switch gears a little bit. You were telling me during our break about sledding and things like that that you did. Could you tell me a little bit more about that?

DB:
Oh we had great times. Dirt roads, I said Route 80 was a dirt road. We'd all get together. Some of the guys were older, quite a bit older. You had what was known as bobsleds. We'd go up to the top of one hill and then we'd ride right straight down across the four corners down to the hollow as far as we could. Then we'd take the sled bobs up to the top of the other hill and always somebody would stand on the four corners, just in case the car would come from north or south and stop them. There weren't that many cars back then. When we drove down the hill on the top of Briar Hill, that's a few miles away, we walked quite a bit. The teacher would come that taught in the Briar Hill school district and she would have hot chocolate, and if we wanted to play some games before we went back outside some more. We spent a good many nights when the snow was on the road because the snow didn't melt, they didn't sand it. So we were able to ride down the hills because it was just dirt road underneath. And when there was snow, it was good for sliding down the hill. We had a lot of fun doing that. It was free and parents didn't care if you did it as long as somebody watched the four corners to be sure to stop the car, in case a car was coming. We'd go way up to the top ,up to the [rock cut], and we would go right straight down across the four corners, [we'd sled] right down. Then you'd end up over part way up the next hill and then you climb the next hill and go. I just don't know if kids would do that nowadays if they had the chance. They don't know what they're missing but we had so much doing that. Free, cheap, easy. But my brother did get hurt really bad. He fell off the sled, or bobs, when it was going, he hit a stone. And he split the top of his head open and we had to have the doctor come right to the house. And I know he had his head wrapped up in a gauze, he couldn't leave the house, he had to be perfectly still for a long time. I think probably for 2 or 3 months. But he came out of it ok. The oldest person there was probably thirty-some. He was the one that got him to the house safely and called the doctor and got him there. He split his head, he hit a rock and he split his head, now that sounds weird, but he did. They wrapped his head, they had his head completely wrapped for probably 3 months for it to heal. So, you could have accidents. The bobsled hit something and tipped and he went flying, he was hurt. So you could get hurt. But most generally we had great times. But it could be unsafe too. I know we did that and sometimes we would just have parties at the different school houses. The teachers would have games, I can't remember what board games and like that, they were up in the school house up at night. And have a little wood fire and we could go play games, which was nice. Because kids from the other schools would come. There were quite a few little schools around here. There was one at Briar Hill, one right up here where we lived, and there was one, I don't remember the name of it, going out of town north, I can't remember what the name of that school house was. But there was one, two, three school house[s] and one in Garrattsville. There was three or four little local school houses quite close together that we would plan different events together. So that was another thing we did when we were young. I can't remember what else. I know when I was young I would go to the neighbor's, Lila Telfer's, over on the corner opposite the store. They moved down from a farm way up on the hill and she loved to play flinch and like that. Her father, she lived with her father, he was old and he was a little bit on the cranky side. I was sort of afraid sometimes to go over there but Lila says, "Come on, he really doesn't mind. He's just sort of cranky." Well, he was sort of cranky, but I went over there and I learned how to play a lot of card games. When they moved down from up on the hill, it amazed me, they said, "The sheep were coming." And I said, "What sheep?" Well, they owned sheep, way up on the hill, and it was probably two miles. They drove them down the road. It, of course, was a dirt road. Sheep, they were driving down the road, down and put them in a barn behind the house the right there in the village. And you see sheep coming down the road, herding them like cows. It was amazing to me because I was a little girl then. I thought that was the biggest event of the year, having sheep come down the road. But they moved the sheep down that way when they moved down from up on the hill. But as a little girl, there were a couple of places right in the village that I used to go. I'd go play cards with Lila and then I'd go over to Scotts who lived behind the church, they didn't have any children, and she'd usually make cookies or something so I'd stay over there where she made cookies. And I remember the first doll I ever got for Christmas, she gave me a little doll. And then another lady on the other corner, she never married, so she loved to have company. They all had me come for company and always gave me homemade cookies. That was a nice memory of what I did when I was little.

EH:
You mentioned your brother split his head when he was sledding. Did that really affect the work on the farm or how did y'all have to make up for that?

DB:
No, no Mom never worked on the farm. She always just did the work canning and all that in the house. So she was always at home. But it was scary; it was a mess. And that's what they said, it split his head. Well I don't know how can anybody split their head and still live? I mean in this day and age you would have antibiotics and everything else. I don't know what they put on his head before they wrapped it all up. But they said don't take it off, they wrapped it tight as, it was tight for three months. I don't know if he was either nine or ten. I don't remember. But that was scary. The only thing I ever remember that ever happened bad, that was a bad experience. But I had, when I was a little girl, I was to the neighbors a lot because they liked company and because they didn't have children. I had a good life.

EH:
How far away was the doctor?

DB:
In Edmeston, about seven miles away. And I don't recall. I know he came to the house because back then doctors made calls. It was at night, that was when we used to sled down hills, at night. I do not remember, I just remember that he did it and I remember that his head was wrapped really tight for a long time. If you'd asked me maybe 10 or 15 years ago, I might have remembered a little more about it. I honestly do not remember as well as I used to.

EH:
How did y'all get medical attention if anybody was sick or something like that?

DB:
Usually the doctor came. I woke up one night in the middle night and I couldn't move, I had acute appendicitis and the doctor came to the house and my folks had to take me right to the hospital. I was in the hospital for three weeks because they had ruptured. The doctor came right to the house at 4 or 5 o'clock in the morning. They were very good doctor[s]. [inaudible] Dr. Bishop was from Garrattsville. I know we usually had the doctor from Edmeston. They would come in the middle of the night. I do know that we weren't able to go to the dentist. My folks just didn't have the money for all of us to go to the dentist. We had very poor teeth and most of us had to have our teeth pulled and false teeth before we were very old, probably in high school, I know I had to. But they didn't have the money so we went to the dentist when our tooth ached and we couldn't take it anymore. They'd go and they'd get it pulled. Nowadays it's unheard of that nobody doesn't go to the dentist. That's one thing we didn't do, always if we needed a doctor we always had the doctor. But that was one of the things I guess they felt it wasn't important. When we had a bad tooth ache they would take us right to the dentist right away, so we wouldn't hurt.

EH:
How did other families deal with problems?

DB:
I don't know if people way back then, if other people took their kids to the dentist regularly or not. Now I think about everybody does. I don't know if even the people that had more, if they took their kids to the dentist regularly or not, I don't know. I know we never went to the dentist until our tooth ached and then it felt bad enough and pull it out. Then you didn't have a tooth ache anymore and you'd feel much better.

[START OF TRACK 4, 0:20]
EH:
Were there other things that your parents or even you as parent would prioritize over other things?

DB:
I did not take mine regularly to the dentist either. But I do believe that because there was fluoride in the toothpaste and like that that they didn't have the cavities. Because I don't think any of my kids have false teeth. We must have taken them, must have had teeth filled. But I do not remember taking them regularly to the dentist. But I must have, because they've got their own teeth. But I know my dad and my sister, that passed away, both had typhoid fever, we couldn't be near them. They stayed over at Auntie's house and we couldn't go over and see Dad. I remember Mom used to go over every night after dark. We weren't supposed to be near them so that [none] of us would get typhoid fever. We all had to have all those shots, bad shots. We all had to have shots so we wouldn't get it. He was sick for quite awhile. I don't remember any other big, major things. I know a lot of us had an appendix removed. As for big, serious things, I think we all survived, we all naturally had measles, mumps, chicken pox, because you didn't have shots for those so we all had all of those things. If one got them, the rest of them got them. I remember that five of us, I didn't have mumps, there was only two of us out of the whole family that didn't have mumps. They all had them about the same time. We all had childhood diseases and nowadays you don't have them because of getting immunized. We were ok. I really don't think anybody had anything more serious then. Typhoid fever was very bad for my [dad] and sister. Otherwise, that was the worst thing anybody had. And then two or three of us had our appendix out, but I don't remember hospitalization for anybody else, regular things.

EH:
How did the typhoid fever affect the production on the farm?

DB:
The boys just had to take over. They all knew, they were old enough at the time so they knew what to do. It wasn't during sugaring season.

EH:
That's good.

DB:
During syrup season, no.

EH:
Was it really hard economic times then?

DB:
I don't know. We never thought of ourselves as not having a lot. I know my auntie once made me a dress -plain pink with a pink collar and a pink belt. Ugliest thing you ever saw. But, she made it, so I wore it. We didn't have lots of clothes, we wore the same clothes over and over. Washed them and wore them. We had what we needed. I don't remember ever not having a coat if I needed it or anything. We always had everything we needed. And we ate very well because they had beef and pork and chickens and everything from the garden. We didn't have the fancy vegetables. We had the root potatoes and carrots and peas and corn and beets and lettuce and the radishes. We canned all the vegetables. So we had canned vegetables. We picked raspberries, we picked strawberries. Because we didn't have a freezer we canned those, we froze those, we canned a lot of the meat, chunked beef. We ate very well. Mom made homemade bread all the time. We always had homemade bread. There was a store next door. I remember the bread was ten cents a loaf. But ten cents a loaf was probably, back then, just as hard to come by as 4 dollars or 3 dollars and 89 cents now. We ate very well. We didn't have to buy a lot in the store, flour and sugar, like that. We had all our own vegetables. We didn't have the fancy vegetables, which I'm still learning to like more of them because I never had them. Once I got married, we had our own vegetables too. I'm learning to like some of the yucky vegetables because my daughter loves everything.

EH:
What do you mean by fancy vegetables?

DB:
Well, like broccoli, we didn't raise broccoli, we didn't raise eggplant, we didn't raise.... Think of some more fancy vegetables. You know what they are, I'm sure.

EH:
Like kale...

DB:
We had just the regular and we had them over and over. We had one a different day and we'd go through them and start it in again. But we canned even berries we'd go pick. Strawberries, wild strawberries, and then dad got so that he planted, had strawberries. Raised strawberries plants. We had a lot of strawberries, we had a lot of strawberries then to eat. I remember we picked raspberries. Oh, we always went and picked blackberries, wild blackberries. We always had lots of pies, lots of cakes. That was the main deserts, pies and cakes. About every night after school, when we got home from school, either Mildred or I would have to make a cake because cake didn't last long with all of us. We had a good life.

EH:
How did your life change once you got married? Because you mentioned with the food a little bit.

DB:
Actually not a lot. I did what my mother did. I darned socks though I'd never do it now, I'd throw them out first. You would put patches on overalls. We had a garden. I canned vegetables. I had to carry the water in, heat it, for laundry because we didn't have running water when I first got married either, same as at home. So you had to wash the clothes in the washing machine, put through a ringer and then put them in a couple of tubs of rinse water and then hang them on a line to dry. So it took a lot of time to do just the regular chores. People nowadays don't realize what an advantage they have with a washer and dryer. There's nothing to them, you don't work at all. We got a dishwasher, nobody washes dishes. Back then you did everything, you thought nothing of it. You asked, "Did it change much when I got married and when I left home?" No, I did the same things my mom did. Eventually, when we got electricity, we got a washing machine and I remember we had a freezer before we had a refrigerator. We had learned you could put things in there and get them real cold and then you take them out and they're fine, even if they're a little frozen it works fine, milk or anything, to keep it a little longer. No, I sewed. I made things for the kids. I make fancier things now, quilts and table runners and Christmas tree skirts. Fun things now. But back then you did not have time or the money to buy the material because it is awfully expensive. No, it did not change much. I did the same things my mom did. Cooked things the same way.

EH:
So what are some of the traditions you keep alive and are passing down to your [family]?

DB:
Well, I always still have Thanksgiving dinner. And we have changed. We always used to have Christmas dinner but for the last two years, two or three years, we've decided to have it Christmas Eve. They all want to go to their other side of the family on Christmas Day. I decided if I had it Christmas Eve then everybody could go to their other side of the house where most of them all have it Christmas Day. We changed it to Christmas Eve, which works fine. Everybody brings something for Christmas Eve. But for Thanksgiving, my daughter and I do the whole thing. We do Thanksgiving, the turkey and ham, because there's quite a few of us we have a ham too. But then everybody comes back the next day for leftovers. We all sit down at the table for Thanksgiving. We try to get one of the tables put up as soon as we can, folded up and back upstairs so the kids have a place to play because now that we're here, the house is much smaller than it was over at the farm house. We have a regular, traditional Thanksgiving dinner with pies and cake and turkey and ham and fruit salad, cabbage salad, and vegetables and breads and the homemade rolls and homemade cinnamon rolls. We're going to start right away start getting those in the freezer, the rolls and breads and [things] like that. No, we have it pretty much the same when I was over there and actually when Mom had Thanksgiving for all of us. And we would go up there, we would go up early, my husband and I, because he would always carve the turkey for Mom. And so we'd go up there and have sit down dinner. We've probably added a few more things to the table but I'd do the same thing with Mom, Dad. It's tradition. And everybody comes about 12, Bruce always, my husband, used to cut the turkey. Now, whichever son comes first gets the job of cutting the turkey. We have a good time. My granddaughter can't come from Washington this year in Annandale. It's too hard with two little children, she has it at home. She comes every other year to Thanksgiving but Christmas she doesn't come. We enjoy [the day, the talk and chatter]. Sometimes the guys go out and hunt in the afternoon but lots of times they don't. Traditions carry on, they really do.

EH:
Well, since Thanksgiving is so close I guess you're getting ready for it now and carrying on those traditions.

DB:
Yes, got to get the turkey tomorrow at the latest because a 22 or 24 pound turkey takes just about a week to thaw in the refrigerator. So we have to either go this afternoon to get the turkey so it can start thawing. The things we can we do ahead of time and put in the freezer but the pies and like that, we'll do the day before. Now that my daughter's retired it's much easier because we can get the tables set and so much more done the day before. It won't be that bad.

EH:
And is that how you helped your mother for Thanksgiving?

DB:
Yeah, went up and helped. Take pies up or go up and help when I got through work, I'd stop in and help her. But usually we had the day before Thanksgiving off. When Mom could no longer have it, for awhile we each had our own families' meals, but I would always take Mom's and Dad's up to them when they weren't able to come down. I'd always take the special meals up to them. Things don't change much. Your loved ones are gone but that's life. New ones coming along. I have 12 great grandchildren. Love everyone of them. Life has been good to me, no complaints.

EH:
Well I believe that's about all the time we have today for this interview. Is there anything else you would like to say or something you didn't get to talk about?

DB:
Nothing except I hope I didn't ramble on too much.

EH:
No, you were fabulous. Well thank you so much for giving me the time to sit down and talk to you and interview you, I really appreciated it and loved hearing your story.

DB:
You're most welcome. You're a very nice person and you can come back again if you want to, just visit, not to interview me again, just to visit.

EH:
Thank you.

DB:
You're welcome.

Duration

29:59
13:51
29:59
15:31

Bit Rate/Frequency

128 kbps

Files

Citation

Emily Hopkins, “Dorothy Bolton, November 14, 2012,” CGP Community Stories, accessed August 21, 2017, http://cgpcommunitystories.org/items/show/132.