CGP Community Stories

Marjorie Schellhammer, November 15, 2008

Title

Marjorie Schellhammer, November 15, 2008

Description

Marjorie Schellhammer was born Marjorie Schielto, in Burlington, New York in 1926. It was there that she grew up with her three siblings on her family's dairy farm. In the first part of the interview she recounts rural life during the Great Depression, her experiences learning in a one-room schoolhouse, and what it was like to live and work as a single woman in Albany, New York in the late 1940s.

After marrying, she ran a poultry farm with her husband, Ed Schellhammer in Burlington Flats, New York. Mrs. Schellhammer's recollections of this time include the day-to-day activities of running the farm with her husband, how they restored the farmhouse they were living in, and the stroke her husband had which was the reason they moved their family to Cooperstown, New York in the 1960s. She discusses the changes she has seen in the village of Cooperstown over the past several decades including the gradual shift from the retail and grocery shops that existed on Main Street when her family first moved to Cooperstown, to the gradual spread of baseball souvenir shops that exist on Main Street today.

In large section of this interview, Mrs. Schellhammer describes a recent trip to Rome she took with both her daughters. Detailing where they stayed, the monuments they saw, along with her personal comments on the city, this material would be useful to those researching Americans in Rome.

The remaining material will be useful to those seeking information on the Cooperstown Graduate Program itself. Mrs. Schellhammer, curious to know more about her interviewer, asks questions about the curriculum, housing, and the oral history process.

Mrs. Schellhammer speaks clearly and deliberately and effort was made to reproduce her words faithfully. I have chosen to edit out false starts, both hers and my own, to allow for clear understanding of the statements made. I have noted the frequent laughter of both myself and Mrs. Schellhammer and encourage researchers to consult the actual recordings to experience and appreciate the tone of this interview.

Creator

Michele Blackmore

Publisher

Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University of New York-College at Oneonta

Date

2008-11-15

Rights

New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown, NY

Online Submission

No

Interviewer

Michele Blackmore

Interviewee

Marjorie Schellhammer

Location

Cooperstown, NY

Transcription

Cooperstown Graduate Program
Research and Fieldwork Course (HMUS 520)
Oral History Project
Fall 2008

Interview with Marge Schellhammer by Michele Blackmore

Interviewer: Blackmore, Michele L.
Interviewee: Schellhammer, Marge
Date: November 15, 2008
Location of interview: Cooperstown, New York

Archive or Library Repository: New York State Historical Association Library, Cooperstown, New York

Description:

Marjorie Schellhammer was born Marjorie Schielto, in Burlington, New York in 1926. It was there that she grew up with her three siblings on her family's dairy farm. In the first part of the interview she recounts rural life during the Great Depression, her experiences learning in a one-room schoolhouse, and what it was like to live and work as a single woman in Albany, New York in the late 1940s.
After marrying, she ran a poultry farm with her husband, Ed Schellhammer in Burlington Flats, New York. Mrs. Schellhammer's recollections of this time include the day-to-day activities of running the farm with her husband, how they restored the farmhouse they were living in, and the stroke her husband had which was the reason they moved their family to Cooperstown, New York in the 1960s. She discusses the changes she has seen in the village of Cooperstown over the past several decades including the gradual shift from the retail and grocery shops that existed on Main Street when her family first moved to Cooperstown, to the gradual spread of baseball souvenir shops that exist on Main Street today.
In large section of this interview, Mrs. Schellhammer describes a recent trip to Rome she took with both her daughters. Detailing where they stayed, the monuments they saw, along with her personal comments on the city, this material would be useful to those researching Americans in Rome.
The remaining material will be useful to those seeking information on the Cooperstown Graduate Program itself. Mrs. Schellhammer, curious to know more about her interviewer, asks questions about the curriculum, housing, and the oral history process.
Mrs. Schellhammer speaks clearly and deliberately and effort was made to reproduce her words faithfully. I have chosen to edit out false starts, both hers and my own, to allow for clear understanding of the statements made. I have noted the frequent laughter of both myself and Mrs. Schellhammer and encourage researchers to consult the actual recordings to experience and appreciate the tone of this interview.


Key Terms

Albany, New York
Burlington Flats, New York
Cooperstown, New York
Cooperstown Graduate Program
Dairy farm
Edmeston, New York
European travel
Great Depression
One-room schoolhouse
Poultry farm
Recreation
Rome, Italy
Stroke


Cooperstown Graduate Program
Oral History Project Fall 2008

MS = Marge Schellhammer
MB = Michele Blackmore

[START OF TRACK 1, 0:00]

MB:
This interview of Marge Schellhammer was conducted by Michele Blackmore in Cooperstown, NY on Saturday, November 15, 2008.

[START OF TRACK 2, 0:00]

MB:
And there we go. Well first I'd like to start, can you give me your full name?

MS:
I am Marjorie Schellhammer.

MB:
What was your maiden name?

MS:
My maiden name was Schielto. Which is English, a little Italian, a little Scotch. And my husband Schellhammer, is German.

MB:
Was he from Germany? It's a very German name.




MS:
Oh very German name. It would be his grandfather that came to this country. My husband Ed did not speak German.

MB:
Was he familiar with German? Would he have grown up...?

MS:
Because he grew up on Long Island, he was familiar with a lot of different foreign people. As far as I was concerned, because I always lived around here, I was not familiar with accents and you know, any different nationalities, really.

MB:
Definitely. What year were you born?

MS:
I was born in 1926.

MB:
Ok, that's a good year. And where were you born?

MS:
I was born in Burlington, New York, at home. It would be about 13 miles from Cooperstown, on a farm.

MB:
What kind of farm was it?



MS:
It was a dairy farm. We had cows, but my father also raised sheep for meat and wool. But basically it was dairy, milk.

MB:
How many brothers and sisters do you have?

MS:
I have two sisters, and a brother. My brother is deceased. I had a brother and sister that were older, and then one of my sister's is ten years younger than I am, so she's a kid. [laughs]

MB:
And what are there names?

MS:
It was Robert Schielto, it's Margret Schielto Pew, and Caroline Schielto Lindbergh.

MB:
And did you all grow up in the same house?

MS:
Yes we did. Yes, until we were married and left, yes.

MB:
How many rooms did your house have? Did the girls share a bedroom?



MS:
I shared a bedroom with my older sister. My brother had his own room and actually by the time my older sister left home to work my younger sister then moved in with me so we really did share rooms, yes. And because of the heating situation, I mean a big old farmhouse wasn't all that warm, so there were a limited number of rooms that were heated. So it was good to only have two bedrooms. [laughs]

MB:
Did your father build the farm or did he inherit it?

MS:
He bought it.

MB:
Ok. Oh, go ahead...

MS:
My mother and father had lived there for sixty years and my mother had lived there after my father had died, my mother had lived there for seventy.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
She died when she 93.

MB:
So she, did they move in right when they got married?

MS:
Um, one year after they were married.

MB:
Wow. Did your father have experience farming? Was that something he was...?

MS:
Yes, he was brought up on a farm.

MB:
Was he from New York?

MS:
From the same area.

MB:
Was your mother also from New York?

MS:
Yes. The same area.

MB:
Ok. And what nationalities were they? Can you trace your family back to England or...?

MS:
England. Basically, well both my mother and father's family were back to England but my father's family lived on the border of England and Scotland. So when we saw, visited my grandmother she had this Scottish brogue sometimes. [laughs]
MB:
That's great. And what were your parents' names?

MS:
It was Verna Caddy Schielto

[START OF TRACK 3, 0:00]

MS:
and Clyde Robert Schielto.

MB:
Were they family names at all? Do you have a history of naming people after...?

MS:
My father's name, yes. It had been several generations that Robert that name particularly. The name of Robert was a family name. Not so much with my mother. Although her name was Verna Eaton Caddy and that was from her grandmother.

MB:
I'm curious because I not very familiar with farms, can you talk about growing up on the farm and what you did? If you had to work?

MS:
We all had our chores. We, of course my brother worked outside more. My sisters and I were involved with what few chickens we had for family use. And after my brother left to go to college, I did work outside. I was pretty good on a tractor and I worked in the barn and was up and helped my father mild cows. And yeah, [laughs] I was involved!

MB:
That's good! Did your mother start with you when you were little, just doing things around the house and then kind of...?

MS:
We were always...we had our chores inside and out, yeah. My mother worked very hard because she did go outside and she worked in the barn helping milk cows and do whatever they had to do. But it was almost, it must have been 1940 or 41 before my father got a tractor. So we were using horses. And I did not like driving horses but I did it! [laughs] I didn't feel comfortable with horses.

MB:
Now what were using, were you farming, I mean growing your own food and vegetables?

MS:
We always had a big garden, yes. And my mother put up so many jars of food. But of course at that point we did not have freezers so everything was canned. And yes we raised a lot of our own food and because we did, during the Depression, we did not suffer. We had all that we needed. And my mother did a lot of sewing so she made our clothes. So actually we were fortunate we you see the pictures and hear about the Depression and the food lines...that's something we had no idea, we were not aware of it all.






MB:
Did you, did you have people sharing a lot of things at the time or did you just keep within your family, the food? I mean, were you aware of having to give things to other people?

MS:
My mother was very active in the church and so if there was a family that needed help, she was always one that was there organizing and helping. There was also a very poor large family that lived near my parents and the grandfather of that family made baskets and he not only would weave them, but he cut the wood and did the splint to do them. And I've got some baskets that he made. They would come to my father and want to get potatoes, because we raised a lot of potatoes and that's the way they would pay.

MB:
Oh how neat!

MS:
Baskets that this grandfather made. And when my father and mother were no longer living and we were having to close the house, one of the things that we all wanted was to be sure each of us had at least one of the baskets that had been made. And that would have been 1931, 1932, in that area.

MB:
Do you remember the family's name?

MS:
Yes, Rogers.


[START OF TRACK 4, 0:00]

MB:
Did you play with the kids?


MS:
They well, because we all went to a one-room school and walked, it was about, well less than a quarter of a mile probably. But this family had quite long distance to walk. So when we were permitted with the children, but other than that, only during school times.

MB:
That's interesting, so you only had a one-room school?

MS:
All eight grades. [laughs]

MB:
Do you remember how many kids there were?

MS:
Well it would vary from probably, from about twenty to twenty-five probably. So there might be, and I remember when I started school was in kindergarten, we had one of the largest classes because I think there were seven of us that started at the same time. So you know, the others, the rest of the twenty-five were divided among the other grades.

MB:
And there was just one teacher?

MS:
One teacher.

MB:
Do you remember how the classes went?

MS:
Oh sure [laughs]. My brother always used to say, "Well if you missed it one year, the next year you would hear the same class taught so you'd get caught up with it."

MB:
Definitely [laughs].

MS:
But yeah, you see these old seats, the desks, and in the front of the room would be a row of chairs and when your class was called you went to the front of the room and recited whatever.

MB:
Even when you were little? Even when you were in kindergarten did you have to go?

MS:
Of course there was no kindergarten. You started first grade, that was the beginning.

MB:
Oh, ok.

MS:
And you were usually six years old when you started. But when I look back on it and I think that a lot of the kids that went to [the] one room schoolhouse went to college and did very well.

MB:
Did you go to college?

MS:
I went to a business college. I went to two years in Albany business. My brother was a graduate of Colgate and had a math degree.

MB:
So you went to this one room schoolhouse through eighth grade?

MS:
Through, let me see, through the sixth grade. By that time that had centralized with the Edmeston school. So from seventh grade through high school. I graduated from the Edmeston central school.

MB:
Was it much bigger?

MS:
Yes, yes.

MB:
Did you still know the same people that you started kindergarten with? When you were six? Did you still go to school or did you get separated?

MS:
It's very interesting. Just a couple of, well a month ago, one of the girls that started kindergarten with me or first grade with me and graduated from Edmeston now lives in California and she was here and we had lunch. [laughs]

MB:
Oh how nice!

MS:
So yes. There must have been three of us that started in first grade together, graduated from the Edmeston school. And we still keep in touch.

MB:
Oh, do you write letters and do you have...?

MS:
Oh, Christmas time, you know. And every once and awhile when my friend in California is going to be in the area then we get together.

MB:
And what's her name?

MS:
Elaine. It was Elaine Bull Zimmerman and then her husband died and she remarried and you know, I'm ashamed to say, unless I had my address book, I don't remember what her name is now, [laughs] but, yeah.

MB:
That's so, and you've just kept in contact all these years?

MS:
Yeah.

MB:
That's so nice.

MS:
Yeah.

MB:
So growing up with your brothers and sisters, did you play a lot with kids in the area or were you too far apart?

MS:
Pretty much we played by ourselves. My closest friend lived just about a mile. Of course we walked and did get together, but I think basically we just enjoyed as a family.

MB:
So you got along?

MS:
Oh yeah.

MB:
That's good.



[START OF TRACK 5, 0:00]

MB:
What kind of, specifically, chores did you learn how to cook from your mother? And sew? You said she sewed a lot.

MS:
Yeah, she made all our clothes. All of the girls' clothes. Yes. My sisters and I. Yes she did. She taught us to sew. I think we did more cooking and helping prepare the meals and cleaning up, washing dishes and all of that. I think those in the house were more...I think because my mother could sew so rapidly and so well that she probably didn't take the time to teach us as much and I don't know how I learned to sew because I did sew for my girls, when they were little. I did make some of their dresses. So I guess my mother must have taught me at some point. I don't just remember.

MB:
Were there any special meals that you had? Do you remember her making a traditional meal? Anything for the holidays or birthdays?

MS:
You know it's interesting, we didn't have...we always would have a birthday cake, but as far as the meal, it would probably be what we ordinarily have and it would be pretty much the same thing except you had a birthday cake. And she had a special plate that she had, what would you call it? It was high so you felt special. Only used on birthdays! [laughs]

MB:
[laughs] What were holidays like? Did you have a lot of family in the area? Did you get together?


MS:
My grandmother lived, well she lived in Edmeston, which was about twelve, ten or twelve miles maybe. And we did, my father did have a car and so Christmas day we did spend at my grandmother's. And on Thanksgiving my mother and her sisters would take turns having Thanksgiving so those were the two days that we had big family gatherings. I can just remember when I was probably four or five years old and we used to go to church and it was just a mile. In the wintertime, my mother and father had a cutter. Do you know what that is? A sleigh. You've probably got them up at the museum. And they had one and we would go to church with the horse and cutter and I at that point, because my one sister is so much younger, I was the baby so I got to sit in front between my mother and father where it was snug and warm and my older brother and sister would be in the back where it was not so warm but they were bundled up with blankets. You know there's so many things I forget about. I guess the church had a shed or a barn because that horse was put in under cover during the service and then we would go home again. But I think about that you know, that was fun! That's one of the things, I remember being snuggled up behind the horse. And my mother loved going with the horse. She just thought that was great.

MB:
And would you have a wagon in the summer or was that just something you did in the winter?

[START OF TRACK 6, 0:00]

MS:
It was just in the winter because the roads would get plowed. And of course in the summertime we had the car which was pretty old by today's standards, pretty different, but it ran. But no heater in it. I can remember going to my Grandmother's for Christmas and it got pretty chilly. [laughs]
MB:
Let's see, so how long did you live in that house with your parents?


MS:
Well I graduated from high school when I was eighteen then I went to business college and I worked in Albany for five years and in 1950 I was married. So actually it was home right up until I got married, but I was living in Albany, just coming home weekends and for special...

MB:
How did you decide to go to Albany?

MS:
Well, I would have liked to have gone to college it was 1944, and it was the war, and I couldn't and so the next best thing was to get to a business college which was not as expensive and my parents were able to do that, which made it much harder for them because the didn't have the help at home. My brother was in the service and so they were having to take care of the farm.

MB:
Did they hire anyone? Were there extra people on hand?

MS:
Some of the time we did have a hired man that helped, particularly the harvesting season.


MB:
And would that person stay at the house or just come for the day?

MS:
Some of the time, yes they did. And some of the time it would just be a local man that would come in by the day. But this was a time during the Depression there were lots of young men who were happy to come in for like a dollar a day.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
That's hard to think about.

MB:
And would your parents feed them?

MS:
Oh yes. They'd get three meals, plus their dollar.

MB:
So you lived in Albany for how long?

MS:
I worked five years in Albany.

MB:
Where did you work?


MS:
At the American Optical Company and it was on State Street.


MB:
What did you do?

MS:
I was a secretary for the manager. I guess that was his title.

MB:
Did you enjoy it?

MS:
I did. And there were three of us, my friends who had also graduated from Edmeston but not all in the same year, but I knew them. And we had an apartment together within walking distance of our offices. So it was a fun time, yes.

MB:
Did you go to the movies or did you...?

MS:
Oh yeah. And all of these things you could walk to and I think about it...beautiful theaters really, and we walked to them and I wouldn't dare to now. Or I wouldn't want my children to, you know. But we would take the bus in and you were in an area of Albany that was, now less desirable, but we didn't think nothing of it. That's one of the changes that are not so good.


MB:
Did you have to wear business suits and things?

MS:
Yes.
MB:
Very dressed up?

MS:
Yes, we were dressed. There were no slacks. Of course it was all business suits, yes. In the summertime we could wear cotton dresses, good cotton, but it was always dress shoes.

MB:
What kind of work did you do?

MS:
Well at that time I was doing, of course I took shorthand, so I was doing shorthand, typing. I did the bookkeeping that was done, that was necessary for

[START OF TRACK 7, 0:00]

MS:
the manager, most anything that was involved in the business, filing, whatever. But of course computers were unheard of. And I took shorthand, but they also had machine that the boss would dictate onto the machine and then I would transcribe.

MB:
Did you learn shorthand in school?
MS:
I learned it at the business college, yes.


MB:
I don't even, I wonder if they still teach it? I know my mom knows shorthand.

MS:
I think now, even court reporters use machines. It's machine shorthand. I don't think, I don't know of anybody that's studying shorthand now, but could be.

MB:
Do you still remember it?

MS:
Oh a little bit. Every once and awhile if I'm taking notes for something, you know I can use a little shorthand. It's quicker, but I wouldn't have any speed when you had to, when you were working.

MB:
Do you remember anything else about Albany? I've only been to once. Did you go out to dinner with your friends?

MS:
Oh yes. We had an apartment and of course did a lot of our cooking, but yes. And there were some beautiful restaurants. And the theaters I thought were beautiful. I haven't really been back into downtown Albany, but I think a number of the theaters are no longer there, which seems sad. And I haven't been there since...to be downtown...since the Rockefeller center, it wasn't that...the big complex.

MB:
It's huge. I was very surprised that was there, with all the buildings.

MS:
My husband was in the Albany Veterans Hospital for six months and that would have been 1966, I think it was, and as much as I had lived in Albany, and I knew Albany very well...I drove out to the veterans hospital and I went to see him and when I came out I made a wrong turn and got off the road that would have brought me back. I ended up down in the central part of Albany where they had just demolished all of South Pearl Street where the complex is now. And it was flattened like a bomb had...and I kept thinking to myself, "Well now I've got to get turned around and if I go here I should." And as I would take a street I would come to a blockade. I was frightened. I really was, and I could look in the rear view mirror and see the state office building, but I couldn't figure out how to get there. It was really a frightening experience. But I'll never forget how that looked, when it was just wiped flat.

MB:
Oh wow, right in the middle of the town too.

MS:
Right in the middle. All of South Pearl. South Pearl Street was an area that was just knocked down. But that was where they built the state complex. And I've never been back to go through and to see the finished product.

MB:
Do you remember what used to be there? Where there houses?


MS:
And some businesses. It was one of the poorer sections of Albany. I think there were a number of liquor stores, that kind of thing...saloons, and some apartment buildings but more the lower grade. So it was probably an improvement to bomb them out. But it's something that stuck in my mind.
[START OF TRACK 8, 0:00]

MS:
I'll never forget that experience.

MB:
You eventually got...?

MS:
I eventually, some way, I don't even remember how, I finally found a street I thought, "Well this one I remember." So I got back on to Route 20, which is what I needed to come back home.

MB:
That's good. When did you learn to drive? Did you learn early on? Was that something...?

MS:
When I was sixteen.

MB:
Did your father teach you in his car?

MS:
Yes. Of course I had driven a tractor since I was probably twelve. But yes, my father taught me to drive. I can say it wasn't the greatest experience because he was kind of strict. [laughs]

MB:
But you learned.
MS:
I learned.

MB:
Was it unusual for girls to learn how to drive? No?

MS:
No. In the country most girls did.

MB:
Did you have your own car later on? Or...?

MS:
Never. Never. Always when I was home I would use the family car. But no I never had a car 'til I was married and it was a case of "we" had a car.

MB:
So when did you meet your husband?

MS:
He was from Long Island...Flushing, and when he was in the service, his father bought a farm in Burlington, about a couple of miles from my parents. And actually I met him on a weekend when I was home from working in Albany.

MB:
Oh that's funny. Now do you know why his father bought a farm here? Did they farm on Long Island.



MS:
No. His father worked in one of the shops during the war. Actually he was a supervisor. But Ed's mother died the day he was to be drafted to go into the service and the Red Cross got him permission do he could attend his mother's funeral. And then he left for the service. So I never knew Ed's mother. His father then just wanted to get out of the city...bought this place in Burlington, which needed a lot of work done on it. It was a farm that needed a lot of work, but gave him something to keep his mind...So when Ed left the service he went to where his father was, to the town of Burlington.

MB:
Did they make it a working farm?

MS:
It was a poultry farm.

MB:
Ok.

MS:
But then my husband was also the rural mail carrier out of Burlington Flats Post Office. So we not only had the poultry farm, but he also had income from the Postal Service.

MB:
That must have been really different for him, coming from Flushing to come and live on a farm.


MS:
It was. It was very hard. He was a senior at Queens College and was drafted before he could get his degree. I'm sure he also felt that when he got back he did not go and finish and get it...but when you live on a farm you don't have that much time to.

MB:
What did he study in Queens?

MS:
He was a biology major.

MB:
Oh wow, that's interesting. So when he came back from the service, he was a mail carrier?

MS:
Yes, then he got the job working as a mail carrier. He was one of the fortunate ones who never had to go overseas. He spent his entire service-time in Texas.

MB:
Oh, that's interesting.

MS:
So he was in Texas, which was very hot. And then he was

[START OF TRACK 9, 0:00]

MS:
discharged and came to Burlington in February
MB:
Oh wow! [laughs]

MS:
So that was quite a shock. But, yeah. When I think about it's very interesting. Most people, fellas that were in the service do not talk much about their service record, but he did occasionally because he wasn't seeing the horrible things. One of the things, his responsibility, was doing paperwork and keeping track of the German prisoners that had been brought over and were kept in Texas.

MB:
Really? Hmm.

MS:
And they never had it so good. There were very happy to be in Texas.

MB:
That's really interesting that they would bring them all the way to Texas, to keep them prisoner. How long did he serve?

MS:
Let's see. Four years I think it was. From '41 to '45.

MB:
So the entire time the U.S. was involved. He was drafted right away?

MS:
Must have been '42 because, no see '41 was Pearl Harbor, right? So it must have been '42. And then the war was over in '45, but they weren't automatically, everybody, released. So I'm thinking it was about four years, but you know I don't have the dates, I'm not sure.

MB:
Hmm. That's really interesting. And so, when did you meet him? Were you in college?

MS:
I was home. I was working in Albany, and I just came home for a weekend. I happened to be at a, it was a party at the grange. The grange was really the social center in the community and he was there, and I went with my parents.

MB:
Were you introduced to him? Do you remember?

MS:
Yeah, I guess so. I can't remember by who, but yeah. [laughs]

MB:
And was that it?

MS:
Well, we went together for close to a year before we were married.

MB:
And were you still living in Albany and just coming to visit?
MS:
Except for the last few months, then when I knew I was going to be getting married, I then came home. And I worked for the insurance company in Edmeston for a few months. Made it more convenient. [laughs]

MB:
Now if you were working in Albany, did you drive back or did he come to visit you?

MS:
No, I would be just home on weekends and I could come by bus. Then he would meet me at the bus.

MB:
Ok. And then when you got married, did you have a house?

MS:
We then lived with his father on the farm, yes. And we did a lot of remodeling. I lived in plaster dust for quite a few years. [laughs] We were just getting where I wanted it, I was beginning to think it was pretty good when he had a stroke and was no longer able to work.

MB:
Is that when he went to the hospital?

MS:
That's when he was, it was 1966. We were married in 1950. 1966 that he had a stroke and spent six months


[START OF TRACK 10, 0:00]

MS:
in the Veterans' Hospital in Albany. And then he never regained the use of his left hand, so he was not able to drive a car, of course. But he could do a lot of things with his right hand.

MB:
That's good.

MS:
And then where I had not worked, well I had two daughters and well they were growing up, and I went back to work. Thank goodness that I had enough education so I could do that.

MB:
When were your daughters born?

MS:
My oldest daughter was born in June of 1951 and my second daughter was born in December of 1952.

MB:
Oh, so real close to each other.

MS:
They were about eighteen months apart. And they're still good friends, good sisters.


MB:
Well that's good.

MS:
And that was all, we just had the two girls.

MB:
Now, where did you raise them? In the house that you...?

MS:
We did. And then after...they were in high school when Ed got back home from the Veterans' Hospital. In the meantime his father had died, and we realized that we had to get off the farm and we sold the farm and moved to Cooperstown so that he could walk to the pool, to the gym. And he swam every day. And I went to work then. First I worked up at the library.

MB:
Ok.

MS:
For a short time. And then I worked at Hartwick College for a short time. And then at the end I worked for the court system right here at the county office.

MB:
When you say the library, is it the same library today where Joanne works? Oh that's neat!

MS:
John Guido was the librarian and I was secretary for him.

MB:
So your girls were teenagers when you came to Cooperstown?

MS:
Yeah. So for all those years they had gone to school in Edmeston, they transferred to Cooperstown and graduated out here.

MB:
Why did you choose Cooperstown?

MS:
Just for the gym. So he could get in to the pool.

MB:
Oh, ok. Did you move into this house?

MS:
No, no. We rented for ten years down on Susquehanna Avenue. It was a double house and they were friends of ours and we lived on one side. And then this house came on the market and then we bought the house here. So we bought the house, I have to get back, I think 1977, I think it was.

MB:
So, can you talk a little bit about Cooperstown forty years ago? Was it a lot different?

MS:
Oh yes. It was a lot different because there were so many stores. I think there were two shoe stores, there was a men's shop, there was a beautiful ladies' shop called The Smart Shop which had lovely ladies clothes, there was what is still Ellsworth & Sill's, there was that store. There were shoe repair shops. There were so many things right on Main Street, which are now baseball souvenir shops. It's very different. And not, as most people say, for the better. [laughs] But that's a matter of opinion!

MB:
When did all the baseball stuff start moving in? Do you remember? Because there's a lot of baseball downtown. [laughs]

MS:
Yes there is, isn't there? I don't remember exactly when. It just seemed like it was gradually. A store would close and a baseball shop would come in. And I think it was gradual, it wasn't two years time, suddenly every store was gone.

[START OF TRACK 11, 0:00]

MS:
But gradually we kept losing our stores. The Great American was up on Main Street and there was another grocery store on Main Street. There was just about anything you really needed, right there.

MB:
So, do you remember your address on Susquehanna? I'm just curious.

MS:
Yes, sixty-two. It's very interesting, it was sixty-two Susquehanna, but we're twenty-six Maple.

MB:
That's funny. So, your girls graduated from high school here?
MS:
Yes.

MB:
Did they go to college?

MS:
Yes. My oldest went to CUCO. She was a sociology major. And she was married, actually she graduated from college in May, I think it was over Memorial Day, and she was married the nineteenth of June. But she worked quite a bit for Sibley's Department Store and some of the department stores, there was a fire. And she now works for Aflack. My other daughter went to Bay Path, which was a two-year college in Massachusetts. And she is an officer in Sedna Corporation. So they did ok.

MB:
Where do they live now?

MS:
My older daughter lives in Fairport. It's a suburb of Rochester, New York. And my other daughter is in Southington, Connecticut, which is south of Hartford.

MB:
And I know you have grandsons. How many grandkids do you have?

MS:
Five. My oldest daughter has two boys and my youngest daughter has three girls.



MB:
How nice. And what are their names?

MS:
And they're now, I was going to say they're all educated, but we've got one to go. Peter is a graduate of Kent State, and Michael is a graduate of Albany State, and my oldest granddaughter is a graduate of Wooster Polytech, and the youngest one just graduated from Paul Mitchell beauty salon, and there's one still in college and she will graduate from Castleton in Vermont this year.

MB:
Oh wow, so they've been all over.

MS:
Yeah, yeah. My one daughter had three in college all at the same time. That's a lot of college. [laughs]

MB:
[laughs] It's got to be hard too, to have them all away.

MS:
Yeah, because they all had to stay on campus.

MB:
So, let's see. Let me check my notes. So you moved to Cooperstown in the late '60s?

MS:
'67.

MB:
'67. So did your family help you choose...how did...was it just the gym that you looked for? Did you want to stay close?

MS:
That was the only thing. And I started to work, and there was work up at the library. So it was beneficial for me to be living here and made it possible for Ed to get in to the gym.

MB:
Could he not work after the stroke?

MS:
No, no. Cause he could not drive. He had no use of his left hand. For a long time he had to wear a brace on his foot, but he was able to walk and get around. Some of the time he used a cane, but for the most part he didn't. But that left hand never came back. But he did a lot of refinishing furniture.

[START OF TRACK 12, 0:00]

MS:
He kept busy. And he was a reader, thank goodness, that kept him occupied. 'Cause he wasn't interested in watching a lot of television, but he did read a lot.

MB:
Do you remember your first T.V.? Did you have T.V. when you were...television...?



MS:
We had television on the farm. Because my kids grew up with, trying to think of the program, that all the kids watch back then...can't think of it. But it was one of the cartoons, you know, programs...can't think of it, I should know, but I can't think of it. But no, we had television on the farm so that when they were little they could watch. We restricted it. [laughs] They didn't watch a lot. But there were a lot of programs and we couldn't get public television, we were limited to watch we could get out in the country. You've got a couple of stations, you have Utica, maybe one Syracuse. So there was not a lot kids would want to watch anyway.

MB:
Did they have a lot of chores? Did you give them...?

MS:
The girls?

MB:
Yeah.

MS:
Not a lot. Not outside, inside they had responsibilities. Keep their rooms properly cleaned and helping with the...My younger one really enjoyed being in the kitchen with me. She liked to cook. She is a very good cook. But the older one, she'd rather go outside and follow around behind her father, I guess. But she didn't work outside. And they never were old enough so that they were able to drive tractors or anything. They were never really large enough to control a big machine like that.

MB:
Was it still a poultry farm then?
MS:
Yes.

MB:
How many chickens did you have?

MS:
I don't know. It was over a thousand that were layers, that we'd raise.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
Then we'd raise the poultry, you know, the young chicks. And I laugh because they talk about now the eggs from chickens that have not been fed medicated grains...we were doing that all the time. They were raised on the range. We had range houses. So it's not so new, this business. [laughs]

MB:
So did you collect eggs too? Or just...?

MS:
Yes, we had to collect them. We had machines, they were washed by machine, and then we hand graded them, and then they were picked up. They were packed in cases and they were picked up by a dealer.

MB:
Would they pay by the dozen?


MS:
Yes. [laughs] Oh! This is so long ago, I have to stop to think about it. Yes, it was so much a dozen and then you know, I can't even remember what the prices were. I'm thinking that they were probably averaging between twenty and thirty cents a dozen.

MB:
And would you also sell the chickens for slaughter?

MS:
Yes, yes. But by that time we had a freezer and of course we froze a lot, we dressed and froze a lot. And then the rest would be shipped, and the poulets there were out on the range would be brought in for

[START OF TRACK 13, 0:00]

MS:
the layers, the eggs. We built two chicken houses, two houses for layers, while we were married.

MB:
When you say, "layers," what is that?

MS:
The hens that would lay eggs.

MB:
Oh, ok. Layers, that lay eggs. Ok, I get it. [laughs] Obvious.


MS:
[laughs] Old farm.

MB:
Ok. That's a lot of chickens, wow. Now, the girls wouldn't help? Probably with all the machinery, your daughters probably...?

MS:
They did not have to do much with the chickens, no. I guess I mainly...I did. But I guess I didn't expect the girls to do it. As long was Ed was able, he and I were able to handle it. And at that time we didn't have...When Ed and his father first started they had some cows, some milk. But after Ed and I were married, if we had cattle, it would be just that we raised for meat and beef. So it wasn't the work that we'd had to do when I was home, you know, before I was married.

MB:
Can you kind of describe a typical day? Because you both just worked on the farm? So you would get up...?

MS:
Ed was usually up by five-thirty and I was probably up at six. He would be out feeding chickens and if we had cattle, taking care of the feed while I was getting breakfast and getting the girls up. And if they were in school, making sure they were ready for school, because the bus, school bus, came to the door to pick them up. So then after they left for school, I would be cleaning, just keeping the house, preparing the meals. And when Ed started in the post office, after I guess nine-thirty, he would leave to go do his...deliver mail. And I did collect the eggs, getting them ready for the washer. He would get home about three or four o'clock, about the same time as the school bus got back with the girls. Then he would take care of the evening feeding, the chickens. The water was all piped in, so there was a lot of carrying for that. Towards the end, we weren't carrying a lot of feed, it was automatic. There were big troughs and the feed would in automatically. But when we first were married he carried it. It had to be carried. So it was a lot more work.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
And then there was always cleaning up after the chickens. [laughs] So yeah, it was hard, we worked hard, but it didn't hurt us. I guess there was a kind of satisfaction, even though maybe your income wasn't very high, by these standards, there was a satisfaction in what you were doing. And in the wintertime when there wasn't a lot of crops and things to do, we worked on remodeling this old house...ripping off old plaster, and putting up new wallboard, and we did it ourselves.

MB:
Wow. How old was the house? Do you know?

[START OF TRACK 14, 0:00]

MS:
Now let me think. [inaudible] I would guess that it might have been built about 1920.

MB:
Ok.


MS:
Because soon after I was married, I met someone...an elderly person, and I don't remember, in a grange meeting or something, and they said to me, "Now do live in the old house or the new house?" And I though, "What are they talking about?" And it seems that originally there had been a house on the lawn in front and while they were living there, they built the house where we living, but it had not been taken care of as well as it could have been so that there was a lot of work to be done. When we were first married we did not have plumbing.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
But we soon got it! [laughs] You can live with all of those things. There was electricity, but as I think about it, that's about all you could say, it was electricity. You might have bare bulbs sticking up somewhere but... [laughs]

MB:
Now what kind of remodeling, where you just making improvements or were you...?

MS:
Well, remodeling and restoring, really. I think for at least a year, we had the living room...there was a big, I don't know, twelve foot door, I think...open door going into the living room and we blocked that off so that we could refinish the living room and my husband built bookshelves on one end. We scraped the ceiling, put up some new wallboard. We had some experiences. There was an old paint on the ceiling, which I can't think what they called that now, but so we had planks set up so we'd walk along and we'd scrape the ceiling to get that old paint off. And then we'd put another coat of something, I don't know, I don't remember, whatever my husband bought. And we worked many a night 'til midnight or afterwards. So we got it all done and the next morning I went down and took a look at it, in the living room, and that paint had started to come down and it was hanging down like icicles all over.

MB:
Oh wow.

MS:
And of course in the meantime it was just a bare floor, so it hadn't done any more damage. So then we used scrapers and we scraped off...hours we took, scraping all of that paint that we had put up [laughs] we scraped it all off again, started over again. It was something different [laughs] I'll remember. And then we got the ceiling taken care of and my husband had built bookshelves on either side, and there was just room enough for a couch to be inserted. So I decided that'd we'd paint the walls, cause we all this new wallboard and could paint it, but I would paper just behind that couch, on that one wall. So we spent, at that time, a lot of money on a couple of rolls of wallpaper. And we had it up, and my husband was standing I think on the couch, and he was just painting with a little white brush around the bookcases, some trim, and he lost his balance, and he spilled his

[START OF TRACK 15, 0:00]

MS:
his paint all over my pretty wallpaper.

MS:
So for the next few nights, we had to scrape every bit of that wallpaper off, and it came off very hard. I cried a lot! [laughs] I did! I'm not kidding. I shed a lot of tears, but we said, "Ok." We went back and bought the same thing, the wallpaper again, and redid it.

MB:
Oh no! [laughs]

MS:
[laughs] Yeah. But then when we finally got the living room done, and the new flooring, we then decided to hire someone to do the dining room for us. And by that time, Ed was able to work more at the post office...income was improving a bit, so we hired a carpenter to build a sideboard, and whatever else we wanted built in.

MB:
Was the house finished when you left it?

MS:
Not finished, but downstairs we had had our kitchen remodeled. The bedrooms, we had not done a lot of work, but we had put up enough wallboard and wallpaper so that they were clean and tight. But there was one end of the house, where when the kids were little, it was just a play area...that we had never, we didn't get to do. That was one of the things I was still trying to design and think what I wanted to do with it. So we had finished the part where we lived, you know, for the most part, got in...remodeled the bathroom, which we had put in, which was just you know, to have indoor plumbing. Then we had the bathroom redone, tiled. So yes and no. But we had put a lot of blood and tears into that place and when we felt we had to sell, and again I shed a lot of tears! [laughs] I did. It was very hard to leave after we'd spent so much time, effort doing the place.

MB:
Have you driven by it? Do you go up there at all?

MS:
For years, I would not go near. It just, it was just too hard. But the girls always did, and if they ever had friends around they'd say, "Let's drive by." And they would show...Well we had built a pond in the back, and we had a little boat on it, and the kids swam in it, you know. They had a good childhood. And when I was working, or would be away, and Ed would be back from his mail, he and the girls would be out with the little boat. And they had a raft out on the pond, and they would row to the shore and I could get in. We did have a good time. We had fun.

MB:
It sounds like fun.

MS:
We did, we enjoyed that. So the girls have these great memories and they would go back, but for years I never would go back. I think it was ten or twelve years before I ever wanted to go on that road again. But now I could, now I can.

MB:
Well that's good.

MS:
Sure, sure.

MB:
Now, I know you said you just went to Rome, did you travel at all as a family?


MS:
Ed and I were overseas several times. I think the first time was in 1980. We were, I was working for the court system, but I had a three-week vacation, and we flew

[START OF TRACK 16, 0:00]

MS:
into Amsterdam, and then by bus on a tour. Went through Belgium, and France, and we toured a lot of Europe. And we ended up in Oberammergau, Germany at the Passion Play. That was the highlight, the goal. And then back to Amsterdam to fly home. But we were gone for three weeks. And then we went to Great Britain and toured. And then we went to Switzerland one summer. And let me see...the last time we went overseas was in 2001, and it was my 75th birthday and we went to Spain and on the Mediterranean, because I said, I waded in the Mediterranean on my 75th birthday. [laughs]

MB:
[laughs] How nice! How did you decide where to go? Was it just...did you research it?

MS:
Actually Ed would do the research and I would get the crash course on the plane. [laughs] Because I was working.

MB:
So would he pick historic sites he would want to see?

MS:
Well, I guess. And also sometimes we would, we usually traveled with a tour group, and we would see some tour group that was having a trip where we hadn't been. So he would follow up on that and see if it was something we were interested in. And that's really how we would decide to go.

MB:
Did you take a lot of pictures to bring home?

MS:
Ed did. He did, before he had his stroke. He did a lot of photography. Did some weddings and things like that.

MB:
Oh really?

MS:
But after he couldn't use his left hand, he couldn't take as many. And it was hard for him to hold a camera. So I had a camera, but it would be one of these, you know, just cheap point and shoot. And that's all I use to this day! I don't take fancy pictures. But yeah, we would always have some to bring home and show the kids.

MB:
Can you talk a little bit about your trip to Rome?

MS:
This year? It was absolutely gorgeous. I took my two daughters. Ellen, my oldest one, had been to Rome. She had been there with a church group when she was a teenager. Joyce had never been overseas at all. So I just decided that this was what I was going to do. I drove out to Fairport and Ellen and I flew from Rochester to JFK. My other daughter's husband had brought her in, met us there, and then we had a direct flight to Rome, which was perfect. It just went like clockwork. The weather was absolutely perfect. We couldn't have asked for better. And we had beautiful accommodations. It was just, everything just fell in place, and I just love Rome. I'd love to go back. Of course, we spent a whole day at the Vatican. Which, even in a whole day, you don't see it all. And the crowds were, by afternoon, were really tremendous. If someone said to me, "Well, did you see something on the floor?" There was no way you could see any floor! There was so many people. But it was beautiful. But I think the thing, when I think back on the trip, the architecture and the painting and

[START OF TRACK 17, 0:00]

MS:
the art and every building that you went into was so beautiful. And just...we'd walk down these little narrow streets and I know I looked up with my mouth open, but the architecture...And we'd eat in these little family cafes, just off these little narrow streets, and that's the part I just think about. It was just wonderful, just love it.

MB:
Was this part of a tour too?

MS:
We went on our own, but when the travel agent told us, "To get to the Vatican, you really need to be on a tour." Otherwise we'd be standing in a line...so we had a tour and that way we went in the morning, quite early, and they would drive around in the back somewhere where they let you off. So you weren't going in through the front where you could see the lines, hundreds, I swear thousands of people waiting to get in. So we were able to get in, but the security was like going through the airport. The only thing we didn't have to do was take off our shoes.

MB:
Really?

MS:
Yeah, yeah. To get into the Vatican, it was, the security was rigid. Then we also had, the tour guide has us get tickets where you could get on and off a bus. You could get on the city buses and stop wherever you wanted to and get off and get back on. And for two days we could do that so that we all of the, you know, the Coliseum, the Forum, and the touristy things, you know. And it's what we did for two days. And one day we did get a tour ticket and went to Florence. So we spent one day in Florence.

MB:
Oh, nice.

MS:
And that, I think it took us three hours to drive from Rome to Florence. But you got a chance to see the countryside. So it was really nice. Cheap? No! The American dollar was not good. Before we left, I went into the bank and I ordered five hundred dollars in Euros and I got three hundred and fifty-seven.

MB:
Really? Wow.

MS:
Yeah. And the meals and everything, it was very expensive, yeah. I didn't do a whole lot of shopping. [laughs] That's not what I went for. My older daughter did buy a leather jacket, but we kept telling her she could have got it cheaper at Macy's. [laughs] She can say she got it there.

MB:
How was the food?

MS:
Wonderful. Expensive, but wonderful. And of course we had all the Italian food. And we always had Italian wine with our meals, you know, you just don't go to Italy without having your wine. And of course, our meals then were quite expensive, by the time we had dinner.

MB:
Did know any Italian? Or did you need to know any Italian?

MS:
Everybody speaks English.

MB:
Yeah, just kind of point at the menu. [laughs]

MS:
Yeah. In fact a lot of the menus would be written in Italian and underneath would have some English so you could tell. And if you didn't recognize it, you could just ask them, you know they all knew English. We had a beautiful hotel and breakfast was included, the buffet breakfast was great. So we ate a big breakfast, we might have a granola bar in our pocket, so it was really just the one meal. We had to splurge for dinner.

MB:
Do you think you'll do anything like that again with your daughters?


MS:
I'd do it in a minute! [laughs] I don't know, I don't know if I would, but

[START OF TRACK 18, 0:00]

MS:
I'd like to. It's nice to dream. But I could not have gone without them. There was a lot of walking, and come on! I'm 82 years old. The cobblestones were hard and there wasn't much sidewalk. It was streets and you were hoping that the motorcycles, there's motorcycles all around, and a lot of these little Smart cars. And you were really walking in the street hoping you could avoid traffic. I really had a firm grip on one of my daughters and sometimes I had an arm on both of them because we did a lot of walking and it was rough. I was tired by the end of the day. We were within walking distance of the Spanish Steps, the Trivoli fountain, the Pantheon. We were situated so well. And we had maps tour books that we got from the library. The girls could read the maps, I couldn't. I would've been lost. But you know, they'd stop, take a look at the map and we'd start out. One day we were headed for the Pantheon, and that was quite a little walk. We finally got there and I thought, "This is the Pantheon?" It didn't look like anything. And then someone came by and they said, "Well, this is the back." And they said, "It closes at five o'clock." And I think it was like, ten minutes to five. So we were going to have to walk around to get to the front. So we decided we weren't going to do that. So on another day we walked in again and it was so well worth it. The Pantheon has some art and it's beautiful, it's beautiful. And I didn't realize that when we left. It wasn't one of the things that I though, "Well something I gotta be sure and see." And I'm sure glad we did! [laughs]

MB:
That's good. Now which daughter had not been overseas?

MS:
My younger one, Joyce.

MB:
Do you think she'll go again?

MS:
Oh, she'd go again tomorrow.

MB:
That's so fun.

MS:
Coming home, I guess the wind wasn't behind us because it was nine hours and I thought we'd never get back to New York. And I can't read on a bus, train, plane, or anything. I just can't read, and they did. They had their books and it didn't bother them. And I couldn't sleep and that was the longest night. And I though, "Oh! Let's get back to New York." [laughs] But the flights were easy and it was just long, that's all.


MB:
Did you stay in New York at all?

MS:
No.

MB:
No?

MS:
We got into New York and of course you can't get into the airport unless you're flying. But my daughter's husband was there waiting for her, that lives in Connecticut. Ellen and I had, I think it was four hours we waited to catch the plane to Rochester. But we flew Delta, so we didn't have to change, we were within the Delta airport, so we just killed time. By the time you get your luggage and you go through customs and everything...wasn't too bad. But yeah, we did have a little wait at the airport.

MB:
Oh, I'm jealous.

MS:
Oh, it is beautiful. It is. And I love Switzerland and anytime that Ed and I traveled I loved it. But Rome was really the highlight. One of the times we were over in Europe, we went to Venice and northern Italy. That was with Ed, but then we never got down to Rome and that's why I was

[START OF TRACK 19, 0:00]


MS:
that was one of the places I wanted to go. So I said to my girls, "Would you go with me?" And well, yes they would! [laughs]

MB:
[laughs] Well, I think we're losing light. So...oh, actually...do have more you want to talk about?


MS:
[gets up to turn on light] No, that's your area. I was thinking that if you're going to be reading anything...

MB:
Oh, I'm good. I think that I've taken enough of your time actually. If you want to, it's almost dinnertime.

MS:
Well, because I was over at the church, and having lunch with the church group so I don't need much supper, but you do. Do you have your supper with the school or you're on your own?

MB:
I'm on my own. I have my own apartment.

MS:
Oh you do?

MB:
I do, yeah.

MS:
Now where are you?

MB:
I'm on Chestnut. Actually right at Chestnut and Susquehanna. The big white house, right on the corner? That's where I live.


MS:
Are there a number of students that are there?

MB:
Yes. There's five apartments and four of them have, we're all girls...and then there's a mother and son who live across the hallway from me.

MS:
Oh that's a good set up.

MB:
Yeah, it's nice.

MS:
Do have pretty long hours at the college?

MB:
Well we...I have one class a day that's three hours and then I probably spend that or longer, reading and studying every day. But it's really fun. It's what I'm interested in so it doesn't really seem like work sometimes.


MS:
So when you get finished, you should be qualified to work in a museum?

MB:
Well, I've already worked in a museum, but I'll be able to...their goal is one day that I could run a museum. I'll know how to do all the administrative things...know how to deal with a board of directors...and be able to make informed decisions on how to work with a non-profit. I don't know. It still seems early. I can't imagine doing that, but, yeah.

MS:
Did you know this Richard, I don't know what his last name was. Richard or Brian.

MB:
Brian? Brian Richards. I met him a couple of times.

MS:
He would come to our church, so we got to know him. And he's got a wonderful opportunity.

MB:
He just, we talk about him just because he was just here in Cooperstown and just moved. And I believe he's a curator, it has something to do with baseball, because I know he loves baseball.

MS:
It's the Yankees.

MB:
Ok, yeah.

MS:
It's new, it's a new museum or whatever. And so he really has a wonderful opportunity.


MB:
And he's from the South I think, right? I remember him having an accent.

MS:
I think, not too far south. But yeah, maybe Virginia.

MB:
Ok.

MS:
I'm not sure either. I didn't get to know him as well as other members of the church did, but he did come. And because of Cindy I think, and Cindy goes to our church.

MB:
And do you know Jennie at all? She goes there.

MS:
I think she sings in our choir. Does Jennie sing in our choir? I'm not sure, I'm not sure.

MB:
Well we all try to make ourselves known in Cooperstown.

MS:
Yeah, that's good.

MB:
I actually, I volunteer at the school, the elementary school.

MS:
Oh do you?

MB:
For the PTO meetings, once a month? They bring the kids, whoever is in the meeting brings their kids and I help watch them.

MS:
Oh that's good.

MB:
Yeah, try and get to know people.

MS:
Well, that's a good place. When I was just at the meeting with Susan Deer at our church, she was saying, who is it that's running this program you're involved with?

MB:
This class? Will Walker.

MS:
Apparently Susan knew him and he had said to her that he wanted to have the students and the ones that had been interviewed have a get together, have a meeting.

MB:
Oh, that's good. I think, I'm not sure


[START OF TRACK 20, 0:00]
MB:
the date is set, but we've talked about a Saturday in December. I want to say the thirteenth?

MS:
That's what she said. She said that it was possible. Doesn't make any difference, it's fine with me.

MB:
Will you be able to come?

MS:
As far as I know.

MB:
Oh good! Cause we want to get everyone together...so we can all talk about what we talked about.

MS:
It'll be interesting. I know Howard and Alice Talbot I think were also interviewed.

MB:
I think so.

MS:
And I think Susan and Doug Deer, I think. At least Doug Deer, the minister. I'm not so sure about Susan. And I guess there are other ones from the church that were interviewed. But I know Howard and Alice were.


MB:
There should be, well there's fourteen of us, so fourteen people from the church have been interviewed.

MS:
Oh, were they all from this church?

MB:
I believe so.

MS:
Oh, ok. I thought maybe there were, I didn't know, I thought maybe there were other ones too.

MB:
No, I think everyone from the Baptist.


MS:
Well that would be interesting.

MB:
Yeah. Cause I think that the plan is to play a couple of minutes from everybody to hear if somebody has a funny story or something.

MS:
Well that'll be interesting.


MB:
Well I hope so, I hope it's fun.
MS:
I hope it's fun. I hope I'm not embarrassed. I hope that when my voice comes on, cause your voice never sounds right, the same to you. [laughs]

MB:
No. [laughs]

MS:
So maybe no one will recognize it.

MB:
It'll be fine.

MS:
So you have to type these up?

MB:
Yep. I will...I can transfer the recording onto my computer and then I can use headphones and listen to it and type it up.

MS:
I see. And edit if you want to?

MB:
The only edits I'll do is if I fumble with my words or something.

MS:
Or if I fumble with my words! Ok! [laughs]


MB:
[laughs] But now, it'll all be there. And then I'll send a copy to you, so you can read it and make sure I did a good job. So, yeah. Well, that's that. Well, thank you.

MS:
Well, you're very welcome. It was nice that you came. It's nice to meet you.

MB:
Yeah. And I'll be here. I'll be here until 2010, so I'll be around.

MS:
Oh really. This is your first year?

MB:
Oh, I'll just be away in the summer. We all have to do internships in museums and they like us to go anywhere in the country.

MS:
So you don't know? Do they just send you or do have a little chance to?

MB:
I get to choose, but it's where ever I can afford to go, and who's looking. Something interesting to do.

MS:
Your field.

MB:
So alright. I'm going to stop this. Thank you so much.

Files

Collection

Citation

Michele Blackmore, “Marjorie Schellhammer, November 15, 2008,” CGP Community Stories, accessed June 22, 2018, http://cgpcommunitystories.org/items/show/17.