CGP Community Stories

Kathryn Smith Mollach, November 14, 2017

Title

Kathryn Smith Mollach, November 14, 2017

Subject

Cauliflower
Coopperstown, NY
Otsego County, NY
Delaware County, NY
Farming
Agriculture
Herbs
Grange
Cooperstown United Methodist Church
Tanner Hill
Community
Cooperation

Description

Kathryn Smith Mollach was born in 1936. She spent her early childhood in Delaware County, then moved with her family to Cooperstown, New York in 1945. The Smith family were cauliflower farmers. Kathryn discusses farming and the local farming community, as well as the particular challenges of growing cauliflower. Her parents, George W. Smith and Viola Freidenstine Smith, also owned dairy cows and had tenants who ran the dairy business. Kathryn’s brother George Jr. took over the family farm in 1973 when George Sr. retired from farming due to illness.

Kathryn married Francis Leslie “Les” Mollach in 1958. They lived in Syracuse, NY and had three daughters. Following Les’ death in 2009, Kathryn began in earnest her current business, Tanner Hill Herb Farm. She lives in the house she inherited from her mother, where she was raised. Kathryn seeks for the farm to be a place of rejuvenation and restoration. She sells herbs, garden accessories, ceramics, and other garden items from a custom-built shed adjacent to her house.

I interviewed Kathryn at her home on Tanner Hill Road, which has views from the front door of a picturesque pond, and rolling hills all around. Kathryn spoke of the community of farmers she knew growing up, and the differences she sees today. She also discussed her involvement with community groups including the Cooperstown United Methodist Church. When I arrived at Kathryn’s house, she was having coffee with her friend Steve Purcell. Before we began the interview, Steve spoke about how the soil on Tanner Hill, called honeoye silt loam, is very well suited to growing herbs and vegetables. Kathryn references Steve, and this conversation, a few times throughout the interview.

Kathryn speaks jovially and with passion. She has a great laugh. I have retained many of her unique turns of phrase in the interview transcript, but it has been lightly edited for clarity and readability. Researchers are encouraged to consult the audio recordings of the interview, as it is impossible to reproduce all the nuances of Kathryn’s speech.

Creator

Rita Carr

Publisher

Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University of New York-College at Oneonta

Date

2017-11-14

Rights

Cooperstown Graduate Association, Cooperstown, NY

Format

audio/mpeg
27.4mB
audio/mpeg
23.2mB
image/jpeg
1.76mB

Language

en-US

Type

Sound
Image

Identifier

17-004

Coverage

Cooperstown, NY
Upstate New York
1936-2017

Interviewer

Rita Carr

Interviewee

Kathryn Smith Mollach

Location

294 Tanner Hill Rd
Cooperstown, NY
13326

Transcription

RC = Rita Carr

KM = Kathryn Smith Mollach

[START OF TRACK 1, 0:00]

RC:
This is the November 14, 2017 interview of Kathryn Smith Mollach by Rita Carr as part of the Cooperstown Graduate Program's CGP Community Stories program, recorded at Kathryn's home and farm on Tanner Hill Road in Cooperstown. So, Kathryn, when and where were you born?

KM:
I was born November 1, 1936 in the Hancock Hospital in Delaware County, county just south of Otsego County.

RC:
And what was your childhood like?

KM:
Fun [laughs]. I was raised in the country, we lived in a very rural part of America. It was kind of a hardscrabble place, a lot of rocks in Delaware County, but I had a lot of freedom to run and play and explore and be a part of whatever was going on in the family. It was good.

RC:
What were your parents doing there?

KM:
My parents had both gone to Oneonta Teachers College, and they were both teaching at the time when I was born. My mother continued to teach school, and these were one-room country schools at the time, but my father, I think grew a little bit bored from teaching, because he wanted to be outdoors, he liked the outdoors and the outdoors was always a home to him. So, he stopped teaching and decided to really put his efforts into farming.

RC:
So how did he get his start farming?

KM:
It was just a natural extension of where they lived at the time. The previous generations had all been farmers. In fact, there is a Milk Street in Boston which is our relatives, they came over I think in 1600s, near the time of the Mayflower, and they were herdsmen, and so they always had been herdsmen and they continued to be herdsmen and of course grow their own food and live as people did in the country. So, I could go into all kinds of historical reference, but I think we're going a little forward, yes? So, in 1945, I think it was, my father and his brother were growing cauliflower in Delaware County. This was after World War I, in fact they started around the time I was born, '36, '33, '34, '35, '36, and in that small country area where my father's home was people were quite poor. They had a dairy, and that was [their] main livelihood, and my father and [his] brother brought to the community this growing of cauliflower. All the friends and relatives, they got to help them work the farm, and then after awhile the relatives and friends decided, well, they could grow some too, so it began to be a cooperative. They would cooperate in terms of getting the resources to grow the cauliflower, and they would cooperate in terms of helping each other out in different times of harvest, and they would bring the cauliflower to a certain place where it would be collected and shipped to New York City. The cooperative or community effort was a longstanding concept in my family, going way back to my great grandfather.

[TRACK 1, 05:37]

RC:
What brought your family to Cooperstown and Otsego County?

KM:
Right. In 1945, Lester Hanson, who had a farm just over the hill from here, called my Uncle Milton and said "Milt! There's a great farm up here, you ought to come up and take a look at it." Milton and Lester Hanson had gone to school together at Delhi Ag School, and knew each other. And so, Milton and my father, George, came up and took a look at the Gilchrist place, which is the place down there with the white house and barns, and they brought their grandmother with them, who had actually raised them, ’cause they were orphaned early, and Grandma looked around and she said, "Look boys, no rocks!" [laughter] So, they bought the farm, and they had already started their cauliflower plants in Delaware County, so I remember, I was probably seven or so, and I remember driving up here with carloads of plants in the back, and other things that they would need to put the cauliflower in here. So that had to be quite a summer for everybody, and my aunt and uncle and cousin and our family, which was my father, mother and my brother and me, we all lived in that house down there for that summer and I think maybe that winter. After that they bought this place up here, and eventually my uncle went back to Delaware County, and my father was the main producer in this venture. And then he added on this land, and then that land over there, and then more land over the hill, and then eventually it got to be about 580 acres. But the forties and fifties were a big, big, big, cauliflower raising time. Not only that, we had a barn full of cows here, and a barn full of cows over on the other farm that he had bought, as well as families living in both places that would, the men would do the dairying, and the whole family of kids and wives would come and work in the cauliflower for extra income, and it seemed to be a very good time. The one family, in the house over the hill, the Butler family, had come along with the place. They had worked for the person who owned the place before my father bought it, and you know, "You want to stay on?" "Yeah!" And so, they lived there and raised eight children, I think. And our family and their family are still in close contact, and it was just a wonderful kind of relationship. Cauliflower is hard work. It requires particular soil, it requires particular handling, there are a lot of diseases, clubroot, I used to be able to name 'em off, let me think. The cabbage worms get in them, too, a little white butterfly comes and lays its eggs in the cauliflower when it's just coming on, it makes a real mess. But anyway, you have to start it in the greenhouse from seed, then you have to transplant each one, and then you have to put them out in the cold frame, and get them acclimated. There was a particular cauliflower planting machine, which I have pictures of, and which we actually still have, whereby you planted the cauliflower. Two people sit on it, it's quite a machine. And then, what you would miss, people would go along with a dibble - do you know what a dibble is?

RC:
Yes

KM:
Yeah, you dibble in the ones that were missing. And that's all after you had picked rock and harrowed and plowed and got the soil all beautifully ready. And preferably, also rolled.

RC:
What do you mean rolled?

KM:
Well, made it really smooth. After you harrow it's still a little bumpy, and then you take a roller, it's this big, round, bin thing, that you fill with water to make it heavy and roll it smooth. Then the cauliflower grows, and when it gets to be a small head, you take string and you tie each one, tie the leaves around so that it makes a shade for the cauliflower so it keeps white, because the customers like the white. That was a labor of love. We'd have different colored strings for different days that we tied, because it ripens at different times, so the different color strings would mean, "ok, we tied red on Monday, and let's see, today is Friday, maybe it's ready to go market, we'll cut red today." So on and so forth. And then we'd hitch up Dick and Dan to cauliflower carts and the carts would move through, by themselves, they knew the drill, “Get up Dan!”

RC:
Were they horses?

KM:
The horses, would know the drill, and they'd go through the fields, and the guys would go and cut two rows on either side, and throw it up in the cart. I wish I had an old cauliflower cart. They were special. And then, bring the cart down to the packing shed, back it in, unload it, and then you'd have to cut the leaves off. So, guys would stand there with a big knife, and cut the leaves off, throw it on the table. Ladies would pack the cauliflower in crates, 12 to a crate, and we'd nail the lids on and stack ’em. When I was in my prime, I could stack just as high as the guys, five crates high. But I don't think I would be able to do that today. But I don't even want to do that today, thank you very much [laughter]. Those were the cauliflower days. We had a lot of local help, we had big, Reo trucks that would take it to New York City. I think they were tractor trailers. We had to hire drivers, and my father would be up from quarter to four in the morning ’til late at night, tracking, ’cause trucks break down, or you get down to the city and they don't want take your load for some reason or another at the market, and so my father probably worked 20 hour days. He would get up before anybody else came to work, and he would have a load cut and ready to pack so that there wouldn't be wait time, you wouldn't have to stand around and do nothing, oh for goodness' sakes let's not do that. So that was pretty much what the cauliflower days were about. In 1973 my dad got sick, and my brother came home and took over the farms, but he just only did the dairy, he did not do cauliflower anymore. It was getting so help was hard to find to work in the fields; people just did not want to do that kind of work anymore. So my brother took over the whole farm except for these 70-plus acres that I have today. He continued to do the diary up until I'm not sure when, but after the dairy was gone he continued to sell the hay, because it's still a good hay-growing place. Meanwhile, I had gone off, gotten married, lived in Syracuse, worked in schools, and had a whole other life, and children, and so forth. But I always thought, when we retire, we'll move down here, and so in '95, my husband and I both retired from the education realm, and I moved back here and started to grow herbs. He still wanted to keep the house in Syracuse, and I didn't know quite why, but when he got sick, I understood better. Our doctors were all up in Syracuse, and so 8, 9 years ago when he got sick we kind of moved back up there and spent the summer up there, spent that year dealing with the cancer. And when he died, I, after awhile I moved back down here and started the business for real. Tanner Hill Herb Farm. I thought, okay, I'm retired, I'm widowed, what am I going to do for the rest of my years? Well, here I am on this beautiful place, I might as well do something, and I said I guess I could fill my days with going to lunch and having a good time, or I could do something that really turns me on and pleases me, and I've always loved growing herbs. So I started the Tanner Hill Herb Farm, and my brother thought I was nuts. Then he kind of got used to it. I've learned so much. I have learned so much. Not only does the working in the soil enrich my life, and there is evidence that working in the soil increases your serotonin. Don't know if that's fact or fiction, but I'm going to trumpet it [laughs] and make believe it's true, because you certainly feel good after you go out and work in the garden. Guess I've got the growing gene in me. Herbs have always been special to me, but I like growing other things too. One of the things that I started growing was heirloom Brandywine tomatoes. My brother was not full of compliments, it was difficult to get those out of him, and he said, "These are the best tomatoes I have ever eaten!" So, I think, and people, as Steve [Purcell] said this morning, it [the soil] certainly grows things very sweet. And the herbs have a different flavor, my daughter Pat said, "This parsley is really, really sweet Mom, you don't get this in the store," and I think she's absolutely right. If I let things go to seed, and I do let things, I let some kale go to seed, I let some cilantro go to seed, and I let some wild rocket or arugula go to seed, you cannot believe how the honey bees absolutely love those flowers. I really should beekeep, but I never got into beekeeping. My brother was allergic to bees, and so I didn't want to encourage that, but it's a temptation to keep bees and see how the different honeys would taste with all the herbs that I grow. So, here I am, I've been doing this for four years. I wouldn't call it a financial success, but there's always next year [laughs] and I am working on getting a different marketing plan, and developing some better strategies for selling for next year. I think that it kind of keeps me out of trouble and keeps me fit and keeps me going.

[TRACK 1, 22:36]

RC:
Nice. So how do you market and sell your herbs as of now?

KM:
Well, year before last I did a little bit of advertising - Mohawk Valley Living came and interviewed me, and I was on Mohawk Valley Living. I had brochures and things around the town. This year, I don't know what it was, I think it was the rainy cold July, just didn't do that bit of advertising. It's mainly people who will come here and buy either potted herbs or cut herbs or I dig herbs, or whatever else they see in the garden that I have plenty of that they might want. Bouquets - I've sold milkweed, whatever it is that you think you might want. I haven't really outreached a lot, but when I inherited this place from my mom, I thought what should I do, what am I going to do with this? It concerned me so much that I actually sat down and wrote a mission statement. And my mission statement was something to the effect that I would like to have a place where people could come and be refreshed and be rejuvenated and find a sense of peace and recreation, re-creation. This year, the people who have sought me out, everybody comes here and seems to have that sense! It has just become amazing to me. What I have, from my friend Rich Pokorny, is certain, I don't want to call them gimmicks, but for lack of a better word at this time I'll call them gimmicks, he said, "Okay, you need signs with red arrows." So, at the triangle, where you go off [Route] 80, I have a big sign that says "Tanner Hill Herb Farm: Follow the Red Arrows." And then there are red arrows posted. There were arrows that Rich made were so beautiful that one got stolen, and so people love to follow the red arrows. He also gave me my motto, which is on my business card - A little out of the way, a lot out of the ordinary. So those are some of the kinds of things that make it enjoyable, you know? I have a plein air painting group that comes here and paints, I've had events here with my garden club, and garden clubs from the surrounding area, the Lake and Valley Garden Club came here last year, year before I had Tomato Fest because I had an abundance of tomatoes, and sometimes Steve brings his tractor and wagon up and gives hayrides and goes up the hill and talks about the land and the heritage a little bit and that's fun. So, I've tried to make it a place where people can get a little knowledge, have a little fun, and maybe buy a few plants. My accountant shakes her head and says, "You have a hobby farm, you have a hobby farm." But one of these days, she's going to be surprised. I hope next year to expand the herbs and not go so much into other vegetables, because that's not my cup of tea. And then market the herbs to some of the restaurants. I have some friends in Fabius who do that in the Syracuse area, and I'm going to touch base with them and see exactly how they do that [laughs]. So that's my plan.

RC:
How much of your land here is cultivated right now with the herb farm operation?

KM:
Oh, golly gee whiz, let's say an acre.

RC:
Okay. And, you have such a beautiful shed there, for the farm. How did that come about?

KM:
Well, I probably shouldn't even tell this story. I will anyway. The shed, I've always loved the packing shed. I spent a lot of my childhood down in that packing shed, packing cauliflower, listening to the help talk, you know, just watching everything and taking it all in and working myself. And it is part of me, and so I've always coveted it. But my brother has used it for storing this tractor and that tractor, and so forth. So, I've always tried to get ahold of it and use it for this business. Well, it wasn't going to be, so I said well, I’ll build my own shed! So that's actually why it's called The Shed, and I just needed a place to sell from and to keep my you know, you get a lot of hoes and rakes and diggers and

[START OF TRACK 2, 0:00]

KM:
Implements when you start something like this, so it's a place where I keep my things that I have for sale. I sell herbs and plants and a little pottery and some garden accessories that I like, like chickens, fake chickens that you can put in the garden, and garden scissors, herb scissors - oh they're wonderful. They're just, five blades on ’em and they're stainless steel and they chop up the herbs so fine. I only sell things that I like personally.

RC:
How does the labor of growing herbs compare to the labor-intensive process of growing cauliflower?

KM:
Herbs are a lot more forgiving. Herbs [pause] don't require a lot of particulars. They're easy to start, they're easy to grow, they're easy to maintain. Cauliflower was specialized and tricky. But I have to say, that the brassicas and that whole genre grows really well in this soil. I planted cabbage this summer and they were huge! And I also tried to grow some cauliflower from seed. The Snowball, the white cauliflower, did not do anything, but I grew some Violetta, which was this purple cauliflower that I've never grown before, and that was wonderful! We enjoyed that. But herbs are easier to grow. Of course, they're not nearly as profitable, cause a little herb goes a long way. But I think people are more apt to use herbs these days as we get into- I know I have two daughters whose health requirements are low salt, actually they're no salt, one daughter has a kidney transplant, the other daughter gave her the kidney, so they don't want to aggravate their one kidney with salt, and I should be on low salt too. You put in the herbs in your soups, in your stews, and on your meat, and on your vegetables, and you forget about salt entirely.

RC:
Why was it so popular here and in Delaware County in the forties and fifties and sixties, why was cauliflower so popular here?

KM:
Okay - mountains. It grows well in a mountainous area where it's way up high and the nights are cool and the days are sunny. So you get the, what Steve was saying, the long day of extended [sunlight], not like in a valley, you get the long day, and the sunny days, and the cool nights, and it likes that. It's traditionally known as a fall crop because of that reason, but here you could grow it in the summertime as well, because we never, we're never without a breeze here. Today is one of the stillest days ever. A lot of times at this time of year and in the winter, you just about blow right off this hill. But I think the wind is good for it too. There's something about the action of the wind that I think is very, very invigorating to cellular activity all over the place.

[TRACK 2, 05:20]

RC:
What was the community of farmers like? I know you talked about the cooperation, could you talk more about that?

KM:
That's right. I've talked about the Hansons, on that side of the hill, and as you came up Armstrong Road, you came to a dip with a lovely house over here and a lovely old gray barn on this side, and that was the Armstrong farm. Les Hanson, Earl Armstrong, and my dad all up here grew cauliflower. So, when somebody needed string, "Oh my gosh I'm out of string, and I don't have any," we'd borrow and swap. There was a lot of communication; they were good friends, and whenever anybody needed something, there was always somebody to go to. Not only did they farm hard in the summers, in the fall they would get together and hunt. They would start with small birds, pheasants and partridges, in the fall, and go onto ducks and go onto deer hunting, which was a big, big party. [laughs] Big party up here, there was always people coming in and out of the house and we'd go into Armstrong's house and just, I used to beg for days off from school to stay home to hunt. When I was twelve years old, my birthday present I asked for was a red plaid jacket, and I was allowed to take my .22 out, and one day I shot a squirrel, and that was kind of the end of that. Didn't care to kill things myself, although venison is still my favorite meat. So yes, there was this sense of community up here as well, and I think when you are in the business of farming, there almost has to be that sense of community, it's small farms. Not only was my father involved with the people who grew cauliflower, but the dairy industry also he was involved in, and Mark Walker, who still lives over that way, the Huffs, and Kellows, who live down that way, they would have what they'd call kitchen conferences, they'd get together at different people's houses and talk about you know, "what's new, what's going on, what outrageous things are happening next." So, yes, there was a definite sense of community.

RC:
And what's community of farmers in this area like today?

KM:
[Pause] It isn't. I don't think it is. Basically, in order to have a running farm you have to go into kind of agribusiness, you have to get big machinery, you have to have more cows than a small farm requires. There doesn't seem to be the same [pause] je ne sais quois. It's very different, very different. I think, with the rise of an emphasis on eating organically, and the sense that our food in the store has so many odd things and preservatives and chemicals in it, I think that in the future you're going to see a return to some small organic farms, but I think it's got a ways to go, and it's hard going. Agribusiness, big farms, take for example the corn. You go through the country and you see cornfields - looks nice, doesn't it? Nobody cultivates the corn anymore, they all spray the corn, the corn is all sprayed and, what's that thing that's, some very bad chemical, Atrazine, I think it is, in the spray that is used, and it's a chemical that doesn't quite dissolve, but it goes into the soil and sticks around for a long, long, time and then after you desert a cornfield and you don't replant it to something else, nothing grows there. It's a sad state. But, maybe it'll turn around, hopefully there'll be some places where chemicals are not used. I do not use, I like to say I don't use - no herbicides, no pesticides, no homicides, no suicides. I tend to grow organically, I don't use fertilizer, except for organic matter, and composting is really a pretty good thing. And green manure, I've got a patch of buckwheat up there that I've just simply cut, and [it] will go back into the soil, and who knows what I'll put up there next year.

[TRACK 2, 12:58]

RC:
So, what do you think the biggest change you would notice from the farming when you were growing up to the farming you do and that others do now, what's the biggest difference?

KM:
I think the biggest difference is that people don't want to do it anymore. People just don't want to do it anymore; they don't want to put in the hard work that it takes to be a farmer. I think there are people who love the land, I think there are people who come from the cities who really love the rural life and want to be a part of the land, but like myself, I would prefer that I would be able to get help to do the hard part [laugh]. It's just it requires a lot of energy and a real love of the land, and there's so many material things out there, and we're so exposed through television and media to consume the material goods that are out there rather than to embrace the natural world that is here, that I'm afraid that's taken its toll. I could have expressed that better, I think, but.

RC:
No, it sounded good.

KM:
[laughs]

RC:
So, why do you think people don't love it like they used to?

KM:
I think it's changing, I think exposure, that's kind of, I go back to the mission statement, A place where people can come and let the stresses of life roll off their backs. I think we live in a very competitive and stressful atmosphere most of the time. Our schools are full of stress, our educational testing is out of control, our pressure to achieve the best education and the best test scores and the best of everything is out of sight and out of control. We don't have a good understanding of a natural development of earth and people. Getting back to a basic rhythm, pattern and acceptance of natural change instead of the hubris which goes along with our own self-actualized egos. I don't know, I'm rambling [laughter].

[TRACK 2, 17:00]

RC:
Are you involved with community groups?

KM:
Yes. I'm involved with the Grange, the Garden club, and church. That's about it.

RC:
Which church do you belong to?

KM:
I belong to the Cooperstown United Methodist Church. It's the one on the corner [of Chestnut Street and Glen Avenue]. We've done a lot of renovation of our building to keep it standing, the windows, the whole structure, and now a terrace in front. But our population is growing old, and people are looking for something different. I'm not sure what. But again, our competitive nature and our emphasis on, I’m going to use that word again, the hubris of sports, kids are very involved in sports on Sundays, so people who are in the church often have very gray hair. Handful of younger kids, no teenagers whatsoever, and that's a sad thing.

RC:
What sorts of things does the Grange do?

KM:
Well, this particular grange has had some very vibrant people in it, and they've had some really great ideas. It was a really big affair back in the turn of the century, the pictures will show just tremendous numbers of people coming. It was a way of life. Like the church, it is faltering because everybody has gray hair, and there aren't young people in it in this area particularly. However, the vibrant people in the grange keep the building going by money raising functions - chicken barbeque, yard sales, and other events. But we also offer the building to the community for community use. So it is, I think, continuing to become a meeting place for different people. One thing, that one of our members Sue Drake has done, is get the [Glimmerglass Festival] opera orchestra to come every year, and some of their singers, and do a program just for us. It's in honor of her mother, and it's a free program, and it is very, very well received. The chicken barbeque is famous, and it would be a sad thing if it wasn't continued. We've had other venues at the building, and the building is there for community use. Our garden club is going to partner with the grange in terms of use of the building, maybe generate interest back and forth, and so I think that'll be a good thing. So, grange, church, what else did I say I was involved with? Garden club. So that keeps me busy enough, and then I have communities that I’m involved with, you know, friends in Syracuse, and fiends in Florida. I keep in touch with a wide variety of relatives, because at one point I was updating the family genealogy. That's how I get to go to Costa Rica next week [for a] wedding.

RC:
We're coming up on an hour, just about, is there anything that we haven't discussed that you would like to?

KM:
Well I have to say that it's an absolute joy to be living here. One would think that I would be tremendously lonely, but because it's isolated, I’m by myself, but I don't feel that way at all. I feel very, very, very content at this point in my life. I enjoy my life, I enjoy what I'm doing, I feel a, I don't know, a wideness within my soul and an outreach that I've never had before, and it's just like a very fulfilling thing that I enjoy being here.

RC:
What do you think prevents you from feeling isolated?

KM:
[Pause] Well, I have a deep faith in the force which keeps us grounded. I guess I might call it God. I have a deep faith in the power of love, which, you might call God, I don't know. [Pause] You can get me started on religion, and I really don't want to go there, but I have a deep faith in the creation and the evolution of things.

RC:
What does it mean to you to be living now where your family did, where you grew up?

KM:
Oh, well, it certainly has deepened my gratitude toward my parents. I cannot believe how they did all they did at the time they did it. And when I look back and see what they did and the risks they took at the time they took them, I just am a little bit overwhelmed and thankful and appreciative.

RC:
Okay, well, I think that's a pretty good place to end [laughter].

KM:
Very good.

RC:
Thank you very much for your time.

KM:
You're welcome.

Duration

29:59 - Track 1
25:20 - Track 2

Bit Rate/Frequency

128kbps

Time Summary

Track 1, 05:37 - Cauliflower farming in Cooperstown
Track 1, 22:36 - Tanner Hill Herb Farm
Track 2, 05:20 - Community of cauliflower farmers
Track 2, 12:58 - Changes in farming today
Track 2, 17:00 - Community involvement

Files

Citation

Rita Carr, “Kathryn Smith Mollach, November 14, 2017,” CGP Community Stories, accessed November 17, 2018, http://cgpcommunitystories.org/items/show/304.