CGP Community Stories

Judith Green, November 14, 2017

Title

Judith Green, November 14, 2017

Subject

Farm life
Family life
Cooperstown
Syracuse
Watertown
Music education
Cooperstown schools
Methodist Church
Activism
Local Politics
National Politics
Women's March
Dairy farming
Beef raising
Vineyard
Hartwick
Democratic Committee
Hartwick Library
Cooperstown Foundation for Excellence
Travel
Hops
Hop kiln
Lynn Green
Judith Green

Description

Judith Green was born in Syracuse, New York, and attended Syracuse University for music education. Shortly after marrying, Green and her husband moved to Watertown, NY where she taught music in the local schools for three years before moving to Cooperstown. Green describes her adjustment to life working the Green family farm, and the process of raising dairy cows and later “beefers” while raising their family of three children. With frankness and levity, Green recounts the challenges and rewards of running a farm part-time alongside her husband, children, and a neighboring farmer named Henry. The restoration of the historic hop kiln on Green’s property and the family’s efforts to cultivate grapes for eventual wine production are particular highlights within the agricultural topics discussed here.

Green recounts her time giving private piano lessons and working in the Cooperstown public schools, where she taught music theory, recorder, and directed choirs. She discusses the value of music education as a path toward both developing personal discipline and expressing oneself. Green’s involvement in the high school’s musical theater productions as an accompanist segued nicely into her familial connections to music. Her mother and father were both musical and fostered Green’s own talent through piano, cello, and organ lessons, as well as singing in the church choir. Green brought music into the lives of her own children, and encouraged their musical involvement and ambitions throughout their childhood and teen years. While discussing her family life, Green speaks of her late husband with potent emotion and affection, and addresses the realities of life after the loss of a partner.

Green also describes her experience attending and participating in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. and discusses her thoughts on the current political climate and the Trump presidency. She expresses political and policy concerns centering around environmental matters, corporate lobbying, economic assistance programs, medical insurance coverage, and a deficit of cross-party civility in government. She also addresses the transition from the caucus system to the petition system for nominating political candidates in the local region, and includes a breakdown of perceived merits and issues of both systems.

Green was and remains heavily involved in the Cooperstown area community. She has participated on the boards of the Hartwick library and the Cooperstown Foundation for Excellence, served as local Democratic Committeewoman, and directed the Methodist Church choir as a volunteer. She has also given a significant amount of her time to volunteer at the Cooperstown schools apart from her pedagogical duties. Though retired, Green is as active in the area as ever. She regards the supportive and close-knit nature of the Cooperstown community a unique aspect of her own life.

False starts, unfinished sentence fragments, and some vocalizations present in the recorded interview audio were not included in this transcript for the sake of clarity. I have made every attempt to preserve the intended meaning of all statements made by Green, and a majority of sentences from this interview remain intact and unabridged.

Creator

Kate Rowell

Publisher

Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University of New York - College at Oneonta

Date

2017-11-14

Rights

Cooperstown Graduate Association, Cooperstown, NY

Format

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Language

en-US

Type

Sound
Image

Identifier

17-016

Coverage

Upstate New York
Cooperstown, NY

Interviewer

Kate Rowell

Interviewee

Judith Green

Location

245 County Highway 59
Cooperstown, NY

Transcription

JG = Judith Green
KR = Kate Rowell

[START OF TRACK 1, 0:00]
KR:
This is Kate Rowell interviewing Judith Green for CGP Community Stories at her residence at 245 County Highway 59 in Cooperstown. It is November 14th, 2017
KR:
Tell me a little bit about your early life.
JG:
Okay, well, I was born in Syracuse NY and grew up there, and went to Syracuse University – we’ll just jump to that. I became a music educator, and then I went and got married, and moved to Watertown, NY. My husband was an attorney and I taught in the Watertown schools. We were there for about three years, and then we moved back to Cooperstown, and built this house, and lived on the family farm. I gave piano lessons – I did not teach in the schools for a while because I was raising my children, they were very little. But then I taught in the Cooperstown schools for about 27 years, also gave piano lessons on the side and was choir director at the Cooperstown Methodist Church for quite a few years. That’s a real thumbnail sketch of what I did as far as music education and my family life.
As for the farm itself, I did not grow up on a farm, but we moved back to Lynn’s family farm, it was a dairy farm to begin with. Early on they had the dairy, but then his father raised beef animals and then we took that over so having never been on a farm, I learned how to take care of animals. I really enjoyed it. When the kids were very little, like 18 months and 9 months, his father went away but they still had dairy animals. So we went down, put the children in the middle of the barn in their strollers and there was no pipeline, so Lynn would milk and then I would take the pails to the bulk tank, so that was my introduction into that. And as I said, later on we raised beef. First, we just bought beef and raised them, but then we got into breeding so we bred some Simmenthal cattle for quite a few years. As I said, I enjoyed it, I enjoyed the animals – that was our weekend. My oldest daughter, one weekend when she was about three, said, “Well, if this is a weekend and we’re doing all this work, I don’t care if we have another weekend!” We both worked during the week and kids were busy, but on weekends we would take care of farm things. So that’s the farm life.
And later on, when we got out of beef, we tried to raise grapes. Lynn would have really liked to have had a vineyard but when they say that that’s a lot of work and not very forgiving, they really mean it. But we did try, we planted a lot of grapes and we do still have some that do produce, but on the whole it just did not turn out to be something we ended up finishing what we started. We also have a hop kiln, along the way. We had a NY state grant and we renovated that. That was renovated in 2004. That’s still a beautiful structure actually, that we store a lot of equipment in. And so that’s farm life.
[TRACK 1, 4:02]
When I taught in the school I started in 1981, and I taught part-time, very part time. Like, one ninth I had three kindergarten classes and gradually every year they would change what I was doing because I was the extra music teacher. So it might be first grade, it might be second grade, and combinations, and I enjoyed that because I enjoy teaching. I mean, that’s what I wanted to do. To me, music education is more beneficial than people know and I’m always concerned that we really may let it go out of schools, or really just not support music education in the way we should. I enjoyed the elementary school, but then as they added more grades to my workload, I ended up with 6th grade, which I never thought I wanted to teach! But [chuckles] they’re interesting children, that was a real challenge and I did enjoy it.
I finally was full-time in 1990, I believe. And friends on the school board teased me that they no longer had the luxury of just trying to vote me in every year, [laughs] that I was actually full time! And then I added 7th grade, and I taught 7th graders for a long time. I had 7th grade choir and 7th grade general music for a while, and then I ended up also with the women’s choir, which was 9th and 10th grade women. That was a lot of fun. So at that point I was teaching 3rd grade, and then I’d go over to the high school and teach 6th and 7th grade, and then have 9th and 10th grade, so I really got to see the kids all the way through. That was a really unique experience because I had a little bit of everything and could see them grow. And it challenged me, too, because then I ended up directing a choir, which I really hadn’t done for most of my music education career. I also accompanied choirs in the elementary school. The other thing I did was I also was the accompanist for the school musicals and for – I’d have to look up how long, but for quite a few years, and that was challenging, too. So that would start in September, and I’d be in on the auditions and all the blocking of the plays and end up in November. So that was another aspect of music education, and a nice challenge, you know, different.
Then I got into choir directing because there was illness with the choir director at the Methodist Church and so I took over part time, not as a position, just as a volunteer type of thing. I did that up until about 7 years ago. And now, I retired from school about 8 years ago, and I still accompany at school and volunteer at school, and play for different churches. And I sing in different groups. I’m no longer teaching piano lessons, but it’s fun to go into school, and see the kids, and work with them.
KR:
You said that music education is more important than we know. What do you mean by that?
JG:
Oh it is! For one thing, it’s a good outlet for kids. It also teaches them a lot, it’s good mathematically. You know, math is a big part of music education, I think most people don’t think about [that]. It’s a good discipline, but also good for expression. You have to be disciplined in order to be artistic, to some extent, you can’t just run off and throw things together. You have to have some idea of what you’re doing. I think that music education teaches that, it’s part of it. I mean, there have been times where someone would say “Well, you know my father says that this is not important, that I don’t need to do this.” Which really upset me, and I had to be calm about saying, “That’s not true. There are so many things you’re going to do. It doesn’t have to be classical music, but it would be nice to know what you’re doing and to express yourself.” And I think that when you get a chance to let kids express themselves, then they’re proud of themselves. They’re proud of what they can do. And you can see that, whether it’s in teaching third grade recorders, which are… interesting. [laughs] I taught third grade recorders for a long time! But you know, when they can actually see that they can actually read the music and hear themselves, it’s a good beginning, it’s a good outlet.
And then with the musicals, sometimes with that, there was a theater arts class that we would take kids from. I worked with Mary-Jo Merk and she was a wonderful director. In her theater arts class, all the kids had to audition whether they wanted to or not, and we came up with some kids that would just blow you away. It was like, they didn’t know they could sing, you didn’t know they could sing, they didn’t know they could act, you didn’t know they could act, and it was fun to see. [It was] a lot of work, but the results with the musicals and recorder class, or with the 6th and 7th grade choir that doesn’t know they can sing, or a women’s choir that had no idea they could sing in three or four parts… it’s a challenge, and it’s gratifying. To them, I hope, and definitely to me.
KR:
So, what has music meant for you? How did you get involved?
JG:
For me? Well, when I was in my house, my mother played the piano, my father sang. We always gathered around at holidays and sang. They sang in the church choir so then I sang in the church choir, but before that I started to take piano lessons. Hated practicing and all that good stuff, but they pushed me, they didn’t say, “You could just stop.” And then I got so that I had some really good piano teachers that were inspiring and I realized that I could really play. And then I wanted to perfect what I was doing, I really enjoyed playing. So I played the piano, and then I played cello for a while because I decided early on I wanted to go to music school and you needed two instruments, really. You could sing, that is your instrument also, but it was better to have another instrument, a physical instrument other than your voice. So I did that, and then I took organ lessons for a while, too, which I would have liked to do more of but the piano teacher at that time said, “You’re doing a little too much here, you’ve got to choose which one you’re going to do, piano or organ,” and so I decided to stay with the piano.
And for teaching music in schools, being able to play is just vital. Without being able to play the piano to some extent, I don’t know, it’s difficult to teach unless you’re a band teacher. So it was just always in my family. That’s what we did, we sang, we played, and as I say, early on I decided that’s what I wanted to do. Really early on, like when I was in 6th or 7th grade, I decided what I wanted to do, was be a music teacher. So then I just geared myself for that.
KR:
What role has music played for your family?
JG:
For my family, all the kids took piano lessons. Jill, the youngest, she took it for the longest amount of time. She studied right through high school, and she’s a beautiful singer, she was in a lot of the musicals I played for. She is very musical, and Amanda played in the band and sang in the choir in school, and Will never sang until recently. He started with piano but gave it up, and played trumpet for a while, and then he started playing the bass guitar. He took it from a very good teacher, Joe Siracusa from Cooperstown, who really taught him how to write and play. And he started to play the bass with his friends, and they would play here. [laughs] You know, young bands. They even, the one band in particular, they were very good for their age, and they started to go around to different places to play. Different bars, and we would take them. When he went to Skidmore he was a music minor, but I said to him, “If you don’t want to teach music, you should think of having something else, too.” Any rate, he’s an attorney, but he’s played with quite a few groups and now another group that plays often, Bourbon and Branch. He’s now singing, which shocks all of us, and he’s pretty good! So my grandchildren coming up, they like to play drums. [chuckles] So that’s starting. Music has just been in our family, all together. My husband was not a musician, but he really just loved to hear everyone play and perform, and he had a good ear. So it was important to him, though he’d never been trained or had a whole lot of inclination [laughs] to carry on with that himself.
KR:
If you feel comfortable, say a little more about Lynn.
JG:
Sure. Well, I met Lynn when he was in law school. It was a blind date that I didn’t want to go on, and I couldn’t remember his name so someone had to go to the door and say it because Lynn was not a name that was common except in this area. And so I met him then and we married in 1971 and we were in Watertown, NY. He did a lot of litigation up there, we were there three years and then we moved back to Cooperstown. He worked with Van Horne, Feury, & Gozigian for a while. Any rate, he was an attorney who loved to have people come in, he listened to everyone’s problems and he also loved the farm. He always wanted to make it viable so that’s my we moved from dairy to beef to grapes to whatever he could think of that would keep the farm going. And also the hop kiln. That was important to him, too, to resurrect that building. And we had a good life together. He died four years ago, and… [sigh] we just did everything together.
[pause] If you want to know more about him, he also did one of these oral histories, so he has his own.
KR:
Can you tell me a bit more about your transition from life in Syracuse to more rural life on the farm with Lynn?
JG:
I just was game to do whatever, you know? I just tried different things. I wasn’t afraid to, or didn’t not want to, I always wanted to be a part of whatever was going on, so that’s what I did. And he was a good teacher, and he expected help [laughs] so I helped, you know, whether it was carrying milk in the barn or helping unload bales of hay when we were haying or working with the animals in the barn or whatever. And so I just was open to doing that. It wasn’t a hard transition for me. I just always felt that trying and working away works! And I didn’t want to get stuck in a rut. Working on a farm is definitely not being stuck in a rut, you learn to do a lot of things and about the time you figure everything’s going along well something breaks. Or as my daughter would say, if you had one chore to do, there’s three others that have to be done before you get to that one chore that you really want to do, whether it’s fixing something or moving something out of the way, whatever. So, I love it, I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.
KR:
What’s the story of the hop kiln?
JG:
The hop kiln?
KR:
Yes.
JG:
The hop kiln. Well, this was originally a hops farm, and so it was just falling apart and when New York state grants came up, Lynn really wanted to resurrect it. I mean, eventually what we really would have liked to do is if we could make the vineyard go. He would have loved that to be a tasting room. Well, we didn’t get that far, but you know, there was that thought. So we got the grant and we worked on cleaning it out and that was an interesting process because there was tons of stuff just in there. And then we found someone who would oversee the project, because it’s much harder than you think to try to do that yourself, to get people to come in. Tom Lieber helped just oversee what was going on and Butch Yager worked on it and the Amish worked on it. They did it all one winter, I’ve got plenty of pictures of taking it down. We took it right down to the rafters and then all of the wood that went back up into it came from the farm. We had someone come and cut the wood here and mill it. They put it back together, and it looks great. It’s beautiful inside, I mean, it’s just a really nice structure. That’s basically the history of it, it still has one of the ovens, and it also has some hop material in it. [We] just didn’t want it to fall apart, so I think it will be good for a while yet!
KR:
Did you have ambitions of using it at some point?
JG:
Well, he wanted to use it for a tasting room if we ever made wine, that’s what he wanted to do. Other than that, it’s really good for storage.
KR:
Did you have any favorite projects that you and Lynn worked on, on your land, on the farm?
JG:
Well, I can tell you that I did have a least favorite project! [laughs] This area has more rock than you can [imagine]. So part of getting ready for planting, you don’t have to worry about with hay, but [with] corn, was picking rock. That’s my least favorite thing on the farm to do, I also learned to drive a tractor so I could be driving the tractor and they could be putting the rock on the wagon behind it. I think the hop kiln project, once we got into it – even though I physically was not constructing it – was really interesting. It was fun to watch each day what was happening. We did, as I said, have to clean it out a lot, so [we] worked on that. And the other thing was I really liked working with the animals. Once we had probably about 12 beefers, and I also liked when we were raising our own calves so that I would go down there and help birth – hopefully you don’t have to, they usually do it on their own. But that was fun. Putting them out in the springtime was always interesting, good to see them outside and running through the meadows. I learned how to build fence. I don’t think that was my favorite thing to do, but I did learn how to help Lynn build fence. We just did a lot of things together, we made it work. The kids helped too. When we had the animals in the barn in the winter, part of the reason we could do this is we also had a man from a neighboring farm, who had his heifers in there so that one of the kids would do the chores in the morning. And then Henry would feed his animals, spread manure, and feed in the nighttime. I mean, otherwise we really could not have done that. But the kids each had a week that they went down so they would get up and help in the morning. I think the animals, I missed them when we had to get rid of them.
KR:
Why did you have to get rid of the animals?
JG:
We had to get rid of them because Lynn had an accident. They were moving animals that had been bred to another farm and one of the animals ran off the truck and up his leg, which really ruined his leg up to the knee. So he had surgery, and pins, and bone grafts put in and all that. And that was when we just had to get rid of them, he couldn’t do it anymore and I certainly couldn’t. And he always would go, “Well maybe we get one,” and I’d say, “No, because one leads to more!” [laughs] That’s why we got rid of them. And that’s why he also wanted to do grapes, and that became more important to him.
KR:
Was that hard on you, when his leg was broken and you had to get rid of the animals?
JG:
Oh, not getting rid of the animals, I was ready at that point because I knew that we couldn’t do it. We just couldn’t do it.
KR:
But Lynn getting hurt, was—
JG:
Oh, yes, yeah. He was laid up for a long time and the leg really was never good again. That was difficult. But you know, he still did some of the haying. We were doing square bales then, we do round bales now. But in the summertime when I wasn’t teaching, part of what I did was to find people to help with the haying. And then if we couldn’t find enough help, it would be Lynn and me down there, unloading wagons. But no, I was ready. I enjoyed the animals when we had them and could really do a good job at it, but you have to let things go after a while, and that was it.
KR:
What role did living in this community have in your life? In working on the farm, in reconstructing the hop kiln?
JG:
The community itself? Or just living in Cooperstown? I mean, the nice thing other than the farm, living in Cooperstown is great because there’s the [Glimmerglass Festival] opera, there’s so many things to do and be a part of, so it’s not a one-dimensional type of life at all, you know? There’s a lot going on with the museums, and art exhibits that come through, all the things that happen. [It] makes it an interesting place to live. And small, so it’s not so big that you can’t be a part of things, I guess.
KR:
Can you say more about the things you’ve taken part in, in the community?
JG:
Well, I was on the library board in Hartwick for quite a few years, and that was interesting. As we grew during the time I was on that board, they expanded the library and added a new section on, that was interesting. I also was Democratic Committeewoman for quite a few years in Hartwick, so I had to run those meetings when we were looking for people to run for office. That’s when we had caucuses, which could be... [laughs] interesting. There would sometimes be some controversy there, but you’re working at something, you’re really into electing people for the town. And it wasn’t really about being Democrat or Republican, it was just about finding good people to run. But that was an interesting aspect. And the other thing, too, was in Hartwick, when the baseball camps came in there was a lot of controversy about having them or not having them. So all of that kind of thing came through this house too, because Lynn was attorney for the town and was active in town politics, and I was also. That was an interesting thing.
I’m active in my church, in the Methodist Church in Cooperstown, and the people there really keep you going. I mean, after his death, thank the lord for them because they’ve been there for me the whole time. And it’s worthwhile work. And with the school, you know, even teaching, but I’m a part of the community also. So other things in school to be working on, volunteer things – whether it’s with the music department or sports, or whatever – that was included, too.
[START OF TRACK 2, 0:00]
So, [it] kept one very busy and active.
KR:
What has it been like since Lynn passed?
JG:
It’s been rough. [pause] It’s a transition. He was on [the] Cooperstown Foundation for Excellence, and I asked if I could be on when he passed. That was close to him and it was close to me, too, though he was on the board. But now I’m on the board, and we do good work providing money for people from the museum to come into the elementary school and work with the kids so that has just been something that I’m interested in and dedicated to. I have grandchildren that live here so I’m very busy with them, which is great. They keep me going. I still do some music accompanying in school. But it’s, you know, as someone said, it’s like losing an arm, you just have to, you have to go on. And this time of year is hard, so you’re getting me a little more weepy than I might be otherwise. So… yes. It’s the making decisions by yourself. Even though you have family, I mean, I have to make decisions by myself. So, you do.
KR:
So, you mentioned the caucuses.
JG:
Right! [laughs] Yeah.
KR:
Care to say more about those?
JG:
Well, there were a lot of technical things about that. People could come, and they have people that would put them up for office, and then you’d have a vote, et cetera. Now you don’t do that, it’s all with petitions. And even though there was something kind of nice about that, because people had to be organized to come in with their little group of people who wanted to run, they had to say something, I think it was a little more interactive. I think with the petitions now, it’s just kind of antiseptic, in a way. Sometimes there would be problems when people did that because if you came in and you were a Republican and there was a Democrat, there would be some flare ups of things. But it was exciting, it was interesting, there was some interaction! You could see what they were going to say, what they might do, what they were interested in. Whereas with the petition, it’s really difficult other than League of Women Voters, thank heavens for them, but that’s like one time. It was just an interesting interaction that I kind of miss.
KR:
And how did you get involved on the Democratic Committee?
JG:
[laughs] Oh, I got involved because my mother-in-law did all these things before me. [chuckles] And when she would stop, then she’d say, “Oh, Judy can do it!” [laughs] That’s really, literally, how it happened. That’s how it was with the library board, too, she said, “Oh, Judy can do it!” So, Judy did it. And they were really active Democrats, so. That’s how I got involved. And it interested me, it wasn’t like they were dragging me along to do it, I was ready to do those kinds of things. [chuckles]
[TRACK 2, 4:13]
KR:
You attended the Women’s March.
JG:
I did.
KR:
Tell me about that experience.
JG:
It was great. My daughter in law, after Mr. [Donald J.] Trump was elected, said “Do you want to go? I’m going to go.” And I said, “Oh yeah, I want to go!” And it was just wonderful, it just brought tears to your eyes. We left on a bus from Oneonta, like two in the morning, and got in I’d say about 11 o’clock and there were so many people. It was just really inspiring. And nobody was there to [bash]. I mean, there was some bashing, yes, of course, but there was such a throng of people all there for the same purpose. To say that our voice counts, you can’t just throw anything at us and expect no feedback, or no opposition. And it was a really great experience. I would not have wanted to go alone, because I was with a group of people and it was so crowded that [one of them] actually got kind of claustrophobic, we had to find a place for her to just get away from the crowds. But no, I’m really, really glad I went. And there was time when I thought, “I don’t know, do I really want to?” But then I thought, “But if you don’t, you will regret not going,” and I would have regretted not going.
KR:
Why did you go?
JG:
I went because I thought, women’s voices and people that had voted… I don’t agree with this president. I can’t stand him. And I thought we needed to show that this was not the way we wanted our country to go, and at that point we didn’t know what was going to happen, and it certainly hasn’t gotten any better. So, that’s why I went. Just to stand up and say, “Hey, what’s going on is not what I stand for, and I don’t like the direction that this is headed.” So that’s why I went.
KR:
So what do you, Judy, stand for? What are your issues?
JG:
What do I stand for? What are my issues? Well, my issues are that I know the country’s being run by a small group of people with a lot of money and a lot of lobbyists. We’re run by corporations, and I’m afraid we’re losing people in the midst of this. All the programs that [President Barak] Obama had put in place, and lifelines for people who don’t have anything are gone, are going. And it took a long time to get there, so that we were helping people that needed help, and not just the gas companies, you know, coal companies. We have a lot of things in front of us. Look at the storms that we’re having. [sigh] It’s not “fake news” that our climate is changing. It’s not “fake news” that people don’t have medical insurance. It’s not “fake news” that children and families are going without any kind of lifelines or help. So it’d be nice to turn the clock back a little bit and I just would like to stop it. The other thing, too, is it would really be nice if people could work together in government again, if there was some kind of civility and “let’s talk about this” rather than “this is the way it’s going to be, period, done.” We get a lot of that. That’s what I stand for, you know? Those are the things that bother me.
KR:
Is that part of the reason why you wanted to be involved with caucuses?
JG:
Yeah.
KR:
And representation?
JG:
Yes, to some extent, because when you don’t have people coming out and talking about what they’re doing, then someone else is going to come in there and just do it. There’s just no --conversation’s not the word, but conversation would be the word. There’s just no back and forth, I think, and that’s my problem with politicians. It’s nice for people to run, but it’d be nicer if you had a little more knowledge of what they stood for and what they wanted to do. And we’re a small community, so when you did have caucuses – and I’m sure other places that have caucuses -- that’s where you learn about your candidates.
Other things I’ve done since I retired and since Lynn died. We travelled a bit, but not a lot. We traveled mainly to California to see our daughters who are there because it was hard to get him to not work. So with friends I went on a Danube River cruise and that was great. And I’ve done a little more travelling.
KR:
What was that opportunity like?
JG:
It was great! It was fun. Lynn would not have liked this kind of a tour because it was literally a bus-type, walking-type thing. But I went on one of the Smartours where yes you were on bus, but you were learning all the time about what the art was where you were going, about the history of the country or the area that you were in, because we landed in Switzerland and went through Austria, then into Germany. And the actual riverboat cruise was on the Danube, from Nuremburg down to Budapest. Now, I didn’t spend tons of time in some of those places but it as just a little overview of things I would never have seen before. I would love to go back to Budapest, that was a really fascinating place and we just did not spend a lot of time there. I went with friends, which was nice, because to travel I’d always travel with Lynn and to travel alone is not what I want to do. I’m going somewhere else soon, I hope, don’t know where yet.
KR:
Where are you considering?
JG:
Perhaps Ireland. I’d also like to go to Wales because that’s where my relatives were from, so that would be nice.
KR:
So, what drives you to travel, go new places?
JG:
Just to see new places, you know? See something else, learn a little bit about it, learn some history, meet new people. That’s about it.
KR:
We’re coming up on our time, I think. Is there anything else you’d like to say about some of the communities in Cooperstown? The Methodist Church, who’ve been supportive of you since Lynn passed?
JG:
Oh, yes! Well, everyone here has been. I have good friends here, good people. That’s the other thing about this community is that because he was well-known and I’ve done a few things in the community, people were very considerate and helpful. And I’m sure that happens other places, but they were very caring, and I’m not sure that happens everywhere, or it’s harder to happen. But everyone here has been really great. This is my home.
KR:
Thank you very much, Judy. Thank you very much.
JG:
You’re welcome.
[END OF TRACK 2, 13:25]

Duration

29:59 - Track 1
13:25 - Track 2

Bit Rate/Frequency

128 kbps

Time Summary

Track 1, 4:02 - Career, Family, Hop Kiln
Track 2, 0:00 - Lynn Green, Local Politics
Track 2, 4:13 - Women's March/Activism

Files

Citation

Kate Rowell, “Judith Green, November 14, 2017,” CGP Community Stories, accessed November 17, 2018, http://cgpcommunitystories.org/items/show/314.